Abraham Lincoln's Accomplishments: Lesson for Kids

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  • 0:03 Most Famous President?
  • 0:20 U.S. Civil War
  • 0:57 Freedom for All
  • 1:59 New Laws
  • 2:38 Lesson Summary
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Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Crystal Ladwig
Abraham Lincoln is one of the most famous presidents in U.S. history. From fighting slavery to building up our economy, he worked hard to improve the lives of everyone in the United States. The impacts of his work still affect each of us today, in more ways than you might realize.

Most Famous President?

Quick! Give me the names of five U.S. presidents…

If you're like most people, you named Abraham Lincoln. Lincoln is considered to be one of the best presidents in U.S. history. What exactly did he accomplish, or do, to become so popular?

U.S. Civil War

Abraham Lincoln became the 16th president of the United States in March 1861. One month later, the U.S. Civil War, or 'The War Between the States', officially began. Lincoln fought hard to keep the United States together as one country rather than splitting into two: the United States of America and the Confederate States of America. It required great character, integrity, leadership, compassion, and honesty, traits that Lincoln is widely known for, to accomplish this feat. Some people believe that Lincoln saved our country by fighting this war and not letting the Confederate states succeed when they tried to form their own country.

Freedom for All

One of Abraham Lincoln's most famous acts was the Emancipation Proclamation (signed January 1, 1863). The Emancipation Proclamation immediately granted freedom to any slaves in Confederate states still fighting the Union if they could get to Union (United States) territory. Before this, escaped slaves were often sent back to their former slave masters like lost property.

At Lincoln's urging, African Americans were also allowed to fight for the Union against the Confederacy and earn their freedom. Nearly 200,000 former slaves and free African Americans signed up to fight against slavery and for freedom for all African Americans.

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