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Achievement Orientation: Definition & Example

Achievement Orientation: Definition & Example
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  • 0:00 What Is Achievement…
  • 1:06 Characteristics
  • 2:11 An Example
  • 3:18 Lesson Summary
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Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Brianna Whiting
In this lesson we will discuss achievement orientation. We will look at some characteristics of the term and apply it to an example. Finally, there will be a summary of the main points and a quiz.

What is Achievement Orientation?

Let's imagine you own your own business. Because you can't operate it on your own, you hire two employees. Sarah is occasionally late to work, never does anything more than the bare minimum, and seems to be content working for minimum wage. Katie, on the other hand, is always early to work. She is always looking for ways that she can help out where needed, even if it means staying late and putting in overtime. Katie wants nothing more than to become a manager one day, or even own her own company. Katie is demonstrating achievement orientation.

So, you may be asking yourself: what is achievement orientation? Well, achievement orientation means having the drive and passion to accomplish goals, excel in all you do, and be successful. These individuals that fall within this category are always striving to improve their work and be more efficient. They want to see results and do better than others. Lastly, they often set high goals and standards and work hard to achieve them.

Characteristics

Now that we know what is meant by the term achievement orientation, let's look at some characteristics of those individuals that fall into this category.

  1. They tend to be leaders. They like to get things done. They meet deadlines, maintain high standards, and look to overcome any circumstance in a positive manner. Because they strive to achieve, others tend to recognize their lead and follow them.
  2. They are responsible. If they make a mistake, they take ownership of it.
  3. They set high standards. Achievement oriented individuals set goals and standards and contemplate how they will reach and exceed them. Those who fall in this category are rarely 100% satisfied, and therefore are always looking for ways to improve.
  4. They are constantly learning in order to be the best they can be find better ways to be more productive.
  5. They possess a positive attitude. They never give up and find ways to encourage others to achieve their goals.

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