Alogia: Definition & Overview

Alogia: Definition & Overview
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  • 0:03 What is Alogia?
  • 0:36 What Does Alogia Sound Like?
  • 1:00 An Example
  • 1:47 Lesson Summary
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Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Chevette Alston

Dr. Alston has taught intro psychology, child psychology, and developmental psychology at 2-year and 4-year schools.

This lesson explains alogia as a lack of speech and describes how can manifest in individuals. It is important to remember alogia is not a deficit in communication skills.

What Is Alogia?

Alogia is the inability to speak because of mental defect, mental confusion, or aphasia. It is a speech disturbance that can be seen in people with dementia. However, it is often associated with the negative symptoms of schizophrenia. Alogia has been called a poverty of speech, or a reduction in the amount of speech. It is also known for a poverty in the content of speech, or speech that does not convey any meaningful information. These difficulties are because the person has difficulty mentally formulating his or her thoughts and words.

What Does Alogia Sound Like?

This lack of speech is often caused by a disruption in one's thought processing and is usually due to an injury in the left hemisphere of the brain that processes meaning in language. Answers to question are very brief. There are no spontaneous additions to conversation, and the responder may sometimes fail to answer the question presented. People with alogia also slur their sentences and will have difficulty pronouncing the consonants of the alphabet.

An Example

It's sometimes easier to explain a concept through an example. Let's go through two conversations, one of which is with a person who has alogia. Our first conversation will be in normal speech; it might go something like this:

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