Anuria: Definition, Causes, Symptoms & Treatment

Anuria: Definition, Causes, Symptoms & Treatment
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  • 0:00 What Is Anuria?
  • 0:55 Causes Of Anuria
  • 2:02 Symptoms Of Anuria
  • 2:22 Treatment Options
  • 2:53 Lesson Summary
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Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Danielle Haak

Danielle has a PhD in Natural Resource Sciences and a MSc in Biological Sciences

Anuria is a condition that occurs when the body isn't producing enough urine, but why would this happen? Watch this lesson to learn about anuria and its causes, symptoms, and possible treatment options.

What Is Anuria?

Urine. Everybody's body produces it, but how many of us know where it actually comes from or what it's for? Turns out, the kidneys are responsible for filtering waste material out of the blood so that it can be removed from the body through urine. For the most part, this process runs smoothly. However, when this system is disrupted, the body doesn't produce enough urine, causing these waste materials to build up in the body.

Anuria is the condition where the body produces too little urine, and if left untreated, it can lead to high blood pressure, heart failure, anemia, platelet disorders, gastrointestinal problems, and even death. Typically, anuria is characterized by a daily urine output that's less than 100 milliliters, and it can be a symptom of kidney failure, which is lethal.

Causes of Anuria

The different types of anuria are categorized based on where the problem is located in the body, which is directly tied to what's causing it. Prerenal anuria occurs when the structural problem is located before the kidneys, such as if there is limited blood flow supplying the kidneys. This can occur due to heart failure, certain diseases, shock, and illnesses.

Renal anuria occurs when the kidneys themselves aren't functioning properly and are failing to produce urine. This can be caused by certain drugs and medications, toxins in the body, autoimmune diseases, congenital kidney disease, muscle trauma, injury, or a number of other diseases.

Postrenal anuria occurs when the structural problem is located after the kidneys, due to a blockage or obstruction preventing urine from flowing to the bladder. This could be due to a urinary tract infection or blockage, a mass in the bladder, prostate problems, and certain diseases.

Other possible causes of anuria include dehydration, infection, stroke, thrombosis, and high blood calcium concentrations.

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