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Argumentative Essay Paper: Definition & Examples

Argumentative Essay Paper: Definition & Examples
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  • 0:01 Definition
  • 0:41 Introductory Paragraph
  • 1:03 Body Paragraphs
  • 2:01 Conclusion
  • 2:22 Proofreading
  • 2:53 Lesson Summary
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Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Mary Firestone
Find out what an argumentative essay is, and learn how to write one. Learn about the differences between the argumentative essay and the persuasive essay.

Definition

An argumentative essay uses evidence and facts to prove whether or not a thesis is true. It presents two sides of a single issue, and covers the most important arguments for and against. People sometimes confuse the argumentative essay and the persuasive essay. The persuasive essay relies heavily on emotional and ethical appeals to persuade readers, and the argumentative essay does not.

Argumentative Essay Structure

The argumentative essay has the same structure as other types of essays. It has a thesis statement, an introductory paragraph, body paragraphs, and a conclusion.

Introductory Paragraph

The introduction to your argumentative essay should engage your readers. Let's say your topic is about social media; you might say that it has changed the world, and then follow up with some statistics that support that. Write a sentence or two about your own experiences with social media. The last sentence in your introduction should be your thesis statement.

Body Paragraphs

Each body paragraph after the introduction should have a topic sentence with an argument. One argument might be that social media helps society. Follow this with supporting details, which in this case might be that Facebook helps military families stay in touch, or that it aids social causes by finding funds for under-served populations (if true).

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