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Assessment Accommodations for Students with Disabilities

Instructor: Jesse Richter

Jesse holds two masters, a doctorate and has 15 years of academic experience in areas of education, linguistics, business and science across five continents.

Looking for ways to assist students with disabilities during assessments? This lesson discusses concepts of assessment accommodations for students with disabilities and provides tangible ideas for implementation.

Jessy's Dilemma

Jessy is a middle school teacher who is charged with evaluating student achievement and comprehension at the end of each quarter. Jessy's class size is considerably large, and she has a significant number of students with a range of diagnosed disabilities. Jessy is well versed with traditional assessment methods, but is struggling to find proper support systems for her disabled students. Let's see what we can do to assist Jessy and her students.

Traditional testing formats, such as multiple choice, may be modified or replaced with more inclusive approaches.
test

A Quick Note On Disabilities

Disabilities may be present in many forms, so it is critical for the proactive educator to understand the nature of various types of disabilities. In some cases, an individual may be coping with a combination of different disabilities. A long list of medically described disabilities exists, but in general we can look at two broad categories: physical disabilities and psychological disabilities.

Physical Disabilities

Physical disabilities may be either temporary (e.g. a broken bone that will eventually heal) or permanent (e.g. a missing limb, visual impairment or musculoskeletal disease). This is essential to know since physically disabled students may only need short-term support, while other students may need long-term support.

Psychological Disabilities

Psychological disabilities may be hereditary or acquired due to a variety of reasons. Examples of psychological hereditary disabilities include autism, bipolar disorder, attention deficit-hyperactivity disorder, major depressive disorder and schizophrenia. An example of an acquired psychological disability is anxiety disorder, which may be caused by some form of psychological trauma, such as the loss of a family member.

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