Behavior Management Plan Template

Instructor: Frank Clint

Frank has been an educator for over 10 years. He has a doctorate degree in education with a concentration in curriculum and instruction.

A positive learning environment is the goal of any behavior management plan. The first days of school set the tone for the rest of the school year. Create your plan using the template provided to ensure a successful school year and peace of mind.

Why Have a Behavior Management Plan?

A written behavior management plan is a way to communicate all of your expectations with students and most importantly with parents. This will make your bond as partners in the education of your students stronger and will show them that you care about creating a positive learning environment.

Rules or Expectations

Provide a section where you clearly state your classroom rules or expectations. Most teachers keep the list short so students can remember them, with developmentally appropriate language for the grade level. Wording should remain positive, and if the school has school-wide rules, the classroom rules or expectations should be consistent with them. For the behavior plan, you will want to also want to develop rules for special situations such as field trips or trips to the library.

Clearly state the positive consequences in your plan. Let students and parents know what you reward students with for positive behavior. Also, state negative consequences when students choose to make behavior choices that are not as positive as you would like. Laying these out here will make it easier if a behavior issue does arise.

Positively Worded Expectation Negatively Worded Expectation
Wait to leave until the teacher dismisses you. Don't get up and leave when the bell rings.

Procedures

Your behavior management plan is an opportunity to explain your classroom procedures to parents. Procedures will vary from teacher to teacher but some common procedures are expected. Routines are what students should do as they enter and exit the classroom, transition from one subject to another, and line up to go to lunch or to a restroom break. In middle and high school, these routines may include dismissal procedures when the bell rings. Make your expectations clear from the beginning so that there is no room for misunderstandings later.

Policies

Also, include any of your policies in your plan. Policies commonly address an array of issues such as tardies, late work, absent work, homework, dress code, cheating, electronic equipment, toys, backpacks, birthday celebrations, holiday parties, parent visits, and many others that may not be listed here.

It is important not to overdo it, as it's likely the campus has a parent handbook that may already address many of these issues. On that same note, you also don't want to contradict any of the policies of the campus or principal. Make sure you get approval from your administrator before sending out a behavior management plan. It may also be a good idea to collaborate with your grade level team to come up with a grade level plan for everyone to use. If you are all consistent, you can all support one another.

Behavior Management Plan Template

Classroom Expectations

1. ________________________________________________________________________________

2. ________________________________________________________________________________

3. ________________________________________________________________________________

4. ________________________________________________________________________________

5. ________________________________________________________________________________

Positive Consequences

1. ________________________________________________________________________________

2. ________________________________________________________________________________

3. ________________________________________________________________________________

4. ________________________________________________________________________________

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