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Bill of Rights Project Ideas

Instructor: David Wood

David has taught Honors Physics, AP Physics, IB Physics and general science courses. He has a Masters in Education, and a Bachelors in Physics.

Help your students learn about the Bill of Rights by trying out a few of these fun projects. Have your students create songs, do research, tell stories, or even create their own Bill of Rights.

Bill of Rights Projects

The Bill of Rights is one of the most important documents in the history of the United States. Without it we wouldn't have freedom of religion, freedom of the press, freedom of assembly, protection against search and seizure, protection against cruel and unusual punishments, and many more. So it's particularly important that students know and understand the Bill of Rights.

Of the many ways that we can teach this subject, one effective way is using projects. Here are a few ideas.

Rights Rhymes

One of the challenges in learning about the Bill of Rights is remembering which amendment is which. What makes this even more confusing is that several amendments contain multiple rights. So one fun project that students can do is to design their own method to better remember the ten amendments that make up the Bill of Rights.

For this project, have students create a song, rap, or poem to help them remember everything they need to know. Students can even vote on which they think is best, and the winner can be the class's official Bill of Rights song.

Constitutional Convention

Another way that you can model the ideas behind the Bill of Rights through a project is by having students attempt to create their own Bill of Rights. There are many rights beyond the ten amendments to the Constitution that people in different places believe are important human rights. Students can discuss ideas for a Bill of Rights for young people everywhere (it's critical that this project apply to people their age). They can even create a Bill of Rights for the classroom.

Whatever the project goal, you should assign students to groups and have each group debate the ideal Bill of Rights. Then have the groups debate one another to come up with a final Bill of Rights for the class or young people everywhere. In doing this project, students will practice their persuasion and debate skills, and learn how often people disagree about such important matters, getting a picture of how hard it was to agree on the Bill of Rights in the first place.

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