Bird Identification Lesson Plan

Instructor: Dana Dance-Schissel

Dana teaches social sciences at the college level and English and psychology at the high school level. She has master's degrees in applied, clinical and community psychology.

What tools are used to identify different types of birds? This lesson plan outlines the process used in bird classification. An activity gives students the chance to compare different orders and species of birds.

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • define taxonomy, order and species
  • summarize the process of bird classification
  • list examples of different orders and species of birds

Length

60 to 90 minutes

Curriculum Standards

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.8.1

Cite the textual evidence that most strongly supports an analysis of what the text says explicitly as well as inferences drawn from the text.

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.8.2

Determine a central idea of a text and analyze its development over the course of the text, including its relationship to supporting ideas; provide an objective summary of the text.

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.8.3

Analyze how a text makes connections among and distinctions between individuals, ideas, or events (e.g., through comparisons, analogies, or categories).

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RI.8.4

Determine the meaning of words and phrases as they are used in a text, including figurative, connotative, and technical meanings; analyze the impact of specific word choices on meaning and tone, including analogies or allusions to other texts.

Materials

  • Assorted photographs of different species of birds
  • Paper copies of the text lesson Bird Species & Orders: Names & Numbers, one for each student
  • A worksheet created using the quiz from the associated text lesson, one for each pair of students
  • Assorted fact sheets (including image, characteristics, order and species) about different species of birds
  • Unlined index cards
  • Scissors
  • Glue

Key Vocabulary

  • Taxonomist
  • Order
  • Species

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