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Civil War Weapons Lesson Plan

Instructor: Christopher Muscato

Chris has a master's degree in history and teaches at the University of Northern Colorado.

With this lesson plan, your students will learn about important weapons of the Civil War. They will debate the morality and significance of new weapons technology through opposing political cartoons.

Learning Objectives

Upon completion of this lesson, students will be able to:

  • Explain the role of weapons technologies in the American Civil War
  • Discuss the ways that weapon technology change impacted American lives
  • Analyze the impact of military technology on American society and opinions

Length

90-120 minutes

Curriculum Standards

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.RH.9-10.2

Determine the central ideas or information of a primary or secondary source; provide an accurate summary of how key events or ideas develop over the course of the text.

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.1.B

Work with peers to set rules for collegial discussions and decision-making (e.g., informal consensus, taking votes on key issues, presentation of alternate views), clear goals and deadlines, and individual roles as needed.

  • CCSS.ELA-LITERACY.SL.9-10.1.D

Respond thoughtfully to diverse perspectives, summarize points of agreement and disagreement, and, when warranted, qualify or justify their own views and understanding and make new connections in light of the evidence and reasoning presented.

Materials

Instructions

  • Begin class with a brief discussion on the Civil War.
    • The American Civil War was one of the bloodiest battles in American history? Why do you think this is? How might changes in weapons technologies have impacted this?
  • Distribute copies of the lesson: American Civil War Weapons: Facts & History.
  • Select two students, and have each read aloud one of the sections ''Weapons'' and ''Small Arms''. Pause here to discuss this information as a class.
    • Why do you think the Civil War generated a new wave of weapons technologies? Why did new kinds of weapons emerge in this time period?
    • How would the transition from single-shot and muzzle-loaded arms to double-action arms change warfare? What difference would this make in military tactics? What would happen if armies tried to use traditional battle tactics with these new technologies?
  • Select two students, and have each read aloud one of the sections ''Long Arms'' and ''Bullets''. Pause here to discuss this information.
    • In terms of military strategy, what would be the difference between using long-range or short-range arms? What are the advantages and disadvantages of each? How do you think new long arms weapons impacted the casualty count of the Civil War?
    • Do we often think of bullet design as an important part of weapon technology?
    • The Civil War is noted for the number of soldiers who were wounded, and who had to have limbs amputated. Why do think this might have been? From what we've seen so far, how do you think new weapons technologies change the types of injuries soldiers received?
  • Select three students to each read aloud the sections ''Cannons'', ''Knives'', and ''Lesson Summary''. Discuss this information as a class.
    • How do you think cannon technology changed the nature of warfare or military tactics in the Civil War?
    • Why do you think Civil War soldiers were exposed to both far and close-range weapons? What does this tell us about the different kinds of fighting that a soldier might encounter? What might this tell us about why the casualty rates of the Civil War were so high?
  • You may test student understanding with the quiz.

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