Coaching in the Hospitality Industry

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  • 0:00 Coaching in Hospitality
  • 0:48 Managerial Coaching Methods
  • 2:31 Employee Feedback
  • 3:10 Lesson Summary
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Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Allison Tanner
This lesson discusses the importance of coaching in the hospitality industry and how manager-led coaching can improve customer service and team collaboration.

Coaching in Hospitality

John manages a top resort in New Mexico. As summer approaches, he is ready to build his new team and start a fantastic summer season. The first step to getting his team ready is to provide a week-long coaching session.

John understands that the hospitality industry aims to provide world class customer services and coaching, or the process of training and development, is essential to building teams that provide great customer service. As a leader in the organization, John also believes that manager-led coaching, or the process when a manager coaches his team members, is highly valuable to creating a cohesive and collaborative work environment. The ultimate goal of coaching is to improve customer service by improving the processes in which the staff engage with the guests.

Managerial Coaching Methods

In general, manager-led coaching is when the manager helps the team to build skills in customer service, communication and teamwork. Depending on the nature of the business, the goals of coaching may shift to meet the business's needs. It is usually done in group or one-on-one sessions.

John always starts his summer season with a week-long group coaching session. The new staff is able to get to know one another, and they learn the tricks of the trade. This includes the company's expectations for working with customers and examples of how to handle various situations. This type of mock coaching in which staff are provided with examples of potential situations allows John to assess how the staff will react to different scenarios and gives him the opportunity to provide suggestions for improvement.

One-on-one, or individual, coaching sessions usually occur during working hours. For example, John might notice that his server Stacy didn't accommodate a special request to substitute salad for fries on the lunch menu. Stacy technically did the right thing because the company prefers not to substitute, but customer satisfaction is the most important, so John sees this as an opportunity to coach Stacy. In this example, John might pull Stacy aside and let her know that she's really doing a great job. He would then explain that although the company prefers not to substitute, customer satisfaction is most important. Instead of saying no, she can say, 'We typically don't do substitutions but let me check with the chef and see if we can make an exception.'

One-on-one coaching allows the manager to:

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