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Converting 162 Meters to Feet: How-To & Tutorial

Instructor: Thomas Higginbotham

Tom has taught math / science at secondary & post-secondary, and a K-12 school administrator. He has a B.S. in Biology and a PhD in Curriculum & Instruction.

Different places in the world use different units to measure length. The Olympics uses the metric system, while Americans use feet, yards, and miles. In this lesson, learn how to make a simple conversion from one measure of distance to another.

Steps to Solving the Problem

The Olympics uses meters to measure the distance of their races, like the 100-meter dash, or the high jump. You know how you always want to play whatever sport it is you happen to be watching? Well, what if you want to accurately measure out a race course, or how high or far you can jump, but only have measuring tape that is labeled in feet? Why, convert it, of course. Fortunately, the conversion is a simple one, as you will see.

There are 3.2808399 feet in a meter. Thus, one meter = 3.2808399 feet. For most measurement calculations though, we can round to the hundredths place, and say one meter = 3.28 feet (we wouldn't be able to measure to a level of precision any greater than that anyhow).

If one meter = 3.28 feet, two meters = 6.56 feet (2 x 3.28), three meters = 9.84 feet (3 x 3.28), etc.

To make this conversion, simply multiply the number of meters by 3.28.

In our problem, you've decided that you want to run 162 meters. You want to mark it off in your yard, so you'll need to use the following formula:

f = 3.28 x m

Where:

f = distance in feet

m = distance in meters

f = 3.28 x m

f = 3.28 x 162

f = 531.36

Solution

We see that 162 meters = 531.36 feet.

Checking Your Work

How can we check to see if our answers make sense?

There should be more feet in a distance than in meters, by a factor of at least three (since there are a little more than 3 feet in a meter, specifically 3.28). This one can be confusing, since meters are 'bigger' than feet, yet there are more feet than there are meters.

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