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Cultural Globalization: Definition, Factors & Effects

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  • 0:02 Definition of Cultural…
  • 0:39 Examples of Cultural…
  • 1:47 Factors of Cultural…
  • 3:20 Effects of Cultural…
  • 4:31 Lesson Summary
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Instructor: Artem Cheprasov

Artem has a doctor of veterinary medicine degree.

In this lesson you will learn what cultural globalization means, how it flows from one place to another, what factors influence this, and the positive and negative effects this has on cultures around the world.

Definition of Cultural Globalization

Have you ever been abroad? It doesn't matter whether you went to Canada, Russia, or Thailand. You may have noticed that every place has some things that are the same as your hometown, such as fast food restaurants like McDonald's or Levi jeans being sold in a local store. Those are just a couple of examples of cultural globalization, which refers to the process by which one culture's experiences, values, and ideas are disseminated throughout the world through various means. We'll explore some examples of cultural globalization, the factors that influence it, and its effects throughout the world.

Examples of Cultural Globalization

While some people tend to find it kind of funny, or perhaps scary, that American fast food restaurants and clothing brands are just about everywhere in the world, cultural globalization is by no means a one-way street. In the U.S., we've adopted lots of great things from other cultures and traditions, including lots of foreign cuisine, like Chinese, Thai, and Mexican food. In Europe, music from various European countries will, despite different languages, be heard in clubs and restaurants. Business leaders from around the world gather in China, Japan, the U.S., and the U.K. to exchange ideas about the direction of their particular field, business culture, and technology. Cultures around the world have also exchanged words or phrases. 'Ok' or the thumbs up sign is now used all over the world thanks to Western influence. But in the U.S., we've adopted words like 'taco' or 'hola!' into our language as well.

Cultural globalization involves the spread of language, the arts, food, business ideas, and technology, and therefore, its impact is felt by almost everybody in the world.

Factors of Cultural Globalization

How are the ideas, values, beliefs, and commodities that contribute to cultural globalism actually spread? Some of them are pretty direct. Tourists, as well as businessmen traveling from one country to another, bring their own particular set of ideas and beliefs that can influence another culture over time. Other factors that contribute to cultural globalization include various means of communication, such as social media, especially Western celebrities who reach an audience of millions around the world with their opinions on fashion or pictures of what the latest style of clothing is.

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