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Developing Trust Between Managers & Employees

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  • 0:02 A Company Without Trust
  • 1:59 Why Is Trust Important?
  • 3:06 Building a…
  • 5:31 Lesson Summary
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Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Rachel Shipley

Rachel has worked with several businesses developing policies on customer experience and administration.

Trust between employees and managers is essential in every workplace. In this lesson, we'll discuss ways to build trusting relationships between you, managers, and your employees to create a harmonious and productive workplace culture.

A Company Without Trust

A small business worked for 30 years to grow their family-run company into a multi-million-dollar business with two retail locations and a client list that included major sports stars and financial heavy hitters. This company from the outside looked like the epitome of a success story. From the inside, not so much. Turnover is at an all-time high, so much so that clients are starting to notice the ever changing faces, and relationships are being lost with clients. What could be wrong with this business?

The inner workings of a company can be very complex. You employ people from all different backgrounds with different experiences and ideas on what a work environment should be. While there are many different pieces of the puzzle, the relationship between your staff and either yourself or the hired manager can significantly affect your business on many levels.

In this particular example, this business has a personnel problem. The employees have absolutely no confidence in their manager. Complaints have been filed about this particular person, such as:

  • There is no confidentiality. You can have a discussion with this person of authority only to find out that others soon also know about said conversation.

  • There is no acknowledgment for my achievements, and the manager often takes credit for them behind my back.

  • My manager lies about what's going on when the CEO is away, often making the staff look bad to boost his importance.

  • Why should I follow the rules if my manager thinks he is above the rules himself?

While these complaints, some more severe than others, are all different on a surface level, the common root of the problem is a lack of trust between the staff and the manager.

Why Is Trust Important?

Trust is defined by Merriam-Webster as 'assured reliance on the character, ability, strength, or truth of someone or something.'

Trust in a manager is vitally important to a business because studies have repeatedly shown that business environments with high levels of trust create significantly more creative and productive employees; this, in turn, drives business profits. When your employees have a stable environment that they feel safe in, they can really be comfortable and focus on their work. Instead of worrying about who is saying what about them, or if someone is trying to get them fired behind their back, they can focus on what's important, namely driving business.

A trustworthy work environment should be one of the top priorities in your company. It is not just something that you preach; it is something that you embody and never stray from. It is said that 'the most expensive thing in the world is trust. It can take years to earn and just a matter of seconds to lose.'

Building a Relationship of Trust

Developing trust can take time, especially if someone has been burned in the past by a colleague or manager. Whether you are just starting a business or have an existing business with or without trust issues, there are always ways to better your business and increase the opportunities to progress your relationships with your employees.

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