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Difference Between Squeeze Page and Landing Page

Instructor: Beth Hendricks

Beth holds a master's degree in integrated marketing communications, and has worked in journalism and marketing throughout her career.

Have you landed or are you being squeezed? Those are two introductions you might have when you visit a website. In this lesson, we'll look at landing and squeeze pages and how the two are different from each other.

Which Page is Which?

Imagine this: You're on the hunt for a prized toy as a Christmas present for your niece. You spot a link for the toy on a popular toy website while checking out your social media newsfeed. Once you click on that link, you arrive at the website where you're greeted by the product you were looking for and pictures of other toys you might be interested in.

Not content with the price you found, you decide to check the price at one other toy website you've purchased from before. When you click onto the website's link, a page pops up requesting your email address for a coupon and continued access to the site. You input your email address and navigate on to the toy you're looking for.

So, what's the difference? Both pages have the toy you were looking for, although with slightly different approaches. The first came in the form of a typical landing page, while the second uses a technique called a squeeze page. What distinguishes one from the other?

What's a Landing Page?

Your landing page is any page that a visitor ''lands'' on when they first check out your website. For example, if you highlight a particular product on a blog post, with a link to that item, when the viewer clicks that link they've hit a landing page.

Many people commonly think of a website's home page as a landing page - and it can be. But, it could also be an events page you advertised in a local newspaper or magazine; a listing of all the book titles you've written in the back of your bestseller; or even a customer review section of your site shared from your social media account.

An example of a landing page is a link clicked from a Google search for the meal delivery service known as HelloFresh. The link promises users a limited-time, 50-percent-off offer. Once you click through to the landing page, you are greeted by not only the offer, but lots of information about the brand and how its system works. It differs from the homepage in terms of not only the offer presented, but the design and details included.

What a Squeeze Page?

A squeeze page, on the other hand, could be a landing page, although a much more focused type of landing page. In fact, a squeeze page is typically so specific that is serves one purpose, and only one purpose: to complete a specified request. That could come in the form of gathering an email address for a newsletter sign-up or to receive a free download, or to compel a purchase.

Squeeze pages focus on a single offer and action. Often, a user is greeted by a single opportunity to either complete the offer or leave the website altogether. The website for the magazine ''GQ'' is periodically a good example of this. They used a squeeze page featuring the image of a famous actor, a heading explaining their ''GQ Daily'' email newsletter and a field where users could submit their email address to sign up.

The idea behind this type of page is that you're ''squeezing'' information out of a guest to your site, in exchange for some offer on your part (like a free ''GQ Daily'' newsletter sent to your inbox).

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