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Dog Science Fair Projects

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  • 0:04 Color Coding
  • 1:34 Paw Preference
  • 2:41 Tricky Training
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Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Melinda Santos
Use your pet pup as inspiration for your next science fair project by checking out some of the projects below. Each activity is safe for both you and your pet and can help you learn a little more about your dog while also having fun.

Color Coding

Need a science fair project and want to involve dogs? Here's a few ideas. First, let's do one involving color coding.

Find out what your dog's favorite color is (or rather what color he/she can see the best) by conducting this easy experiment. Perform this experiment with volunteer dogs to see if all dogs prefer one color over the rest.

Supplies:

  • One sheet of colored paper for each of the following colors: red, green, yellow, blue, purple
  • Dog biscuits or treats
  • Dogs
  • Notebook

Procedure:

1. Place each sheet of colored paper in a horizontal line on the ground, spaced approximately six inches apart.

2. Cut or break a dog treat or biscuit into small pieces, then place one piece on each sheet of paper.

3. Bring the first dog near the line of papers, then let the dog go and observe which color he/she goes to first. Record your observations in your notebook.

4. Remove the dog from the area while you rearrange the colors in a different order and replace the pieces of treats.

5. Bring the dog back and observe which color he/she goes to first in this round.

6. Repeat the procedure two more times with the same dog, being sure to change the placement of each color for each trial and adding new pieces of treats.

7. Conduct the experiment on all other volunteer dogs, one at a time, for a total of four trials per dog.

8. Analyze the final results of the experiment by determining which color each individual dog went to the most (if any), then compare each dog's results to the others and see if any patterns emerge.

Paw Preference

Just as humans can be right-handed or left-handed, canines can also exhibit a preference for one side over the other. See which side your pet prefers with this second project.

Supplies:

  • At least 10 dogs
  • Adhesive foam tape
  • Dog toy that can hold a treat
  • Dog treats
  • A chair or stool
  • Notebook

Procedure:

1. Bring in the first dog volunteer.

2. Place a small piece of adhesive foam tape on the dog's nose.

3. Note which paw the dog uses to take the tape off, and write it in your notebook.

4. Place a dog treat inside the dog toy and give it to the same dog.

5. Watch to see which paw the dog uses to stabilize the toy while he/she tries to extract the treat and note the observation in your notebook.

6. Place a treat under a stool or chair.

7. Observe and record which paw the dog uses to get the treat.

8. Repeat the same procedures for all remaining dogs, recording observations for each.

9. Use your observations to determine which paw each dog seems to prefer, then calculate the total number of dogs that favor each side.

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