End of Year Report Card Comments

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  • 0:00 The Importance of Report Cards
  • 0:35 How are these Comments…
  • 1:10 Areas of Specific Focus
  • 3:20 Formatting
  • 4:05 Lesson Summary
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Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Sharon Linde
Writing report card comments for the end of the year can seem challenging. By this time, you've likely completed three rounds and may be running out of things to say. Don't let this get you down; following this simple plan can help you power through.

The Importance of Report Cards

End-of-year report cards come at a stressful time. In addition to all the other end-of-year hype, teachers need to write an accurate and objective account of how a student performed, not only the past quarter but also for the year. Report card comments have the added pressure of communicating with parents about their most precious resource, their child. Look at this as a chance to do three things:

  • Communicate to the parent how the child has done
  • Set a record for the following year
  • Give advice to the student and family about how to use the summer to keep the learning going

How Are These Comments Different?

During the year, you wrote comments reflective of the specific time - a quarter, trimester, or semester. With these direct parameters, you gave positive feedback, set a goal, and told how you'd structure support. Now, at the end of the year, that formula doesn't apply. End-of-the-year comments have a different slant. You still need to communicate how the student did for the last quarter and, perhaps, semester, but you also need to include comments that will offer advice on how to continue the momentum you instilled this year. Let's take a look at the three strands for end-of-year comments.

Areas of Specific Focus

End of the year report card comments have specific focus in three areas - reporting student strength and struggles, ways to grow in the future, and suggestions for help over the summer.

Strengths and Struggles

The first portion of your comments should focus on reporting how the student performed in relation to specific objectives. Remain objective and use the standard to drive the comment. For example:

  • Olivia is able to compare and contrast important details in text.
  • Ben is showing progress towards comparing and contrasting important details in text, but has not yet mastered the skill.
  • Luke continued to struggle with the concept of comparing and contrasting important details in text.

Making the objective the center of the statement takes judgment out of the comment and allows the parent to view the task as the focus, not the child. Also, using this technique clearly communicates exactly where the student is in relation to the objective.

Ways to Grow

On past report cards, you've had a chance to set goals and offer support for the remainder of the year. Now with students moving on to another grade and teacher, you'll need to offer parents ways for the student to continue to grow without you.

  • When reading with Olivia, ask questions that prompt her to identify the main characters and setting.
  • Help Ben with money concepts by letting him count change at the end of shopping trips.
  • Be sure to challenge Luke by checking out novels from the library.

Remember, parents aren't experts. Be specific with your suggestions.

Summer Help

Finally, combat the backslide students often encounter over the summer by offering specific programs and opportunities for those students in need.

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