Entomology Activities & Games

Instructor: Tawnya Eash

Tawnya has a master's degree in early childhood education and teaches all subjects at an elementary school.

Who would have thought learning about insects would be fun at any age? Use this lesson to find activities and games that keep your students engaged while studying all about insects.

Entomology

Do your students enjoy studying insects? Some may love the creepy, crawly critters like spiders while others may go for the peaceful flight of the butterfly. No matter which type of student you have, they all have an opportunity to turn studying insects into fun!

Here are a few activities and games that will help keep your students involved and excited when learning about bugs. Feel free to adapt any idea to meet the needs of your own students.

Entomology Activities

Extra, Extra, Read All About Bugs!

Unique bugs will capture your attention when your students write this news article.

Materials

  • Technology and computers for each student if available.
    • Students could type on the computer.
    • Students could research and find pictures of their insect.
  • Posters.
  • Markers, crayons, colored pencils.
  • Pens.
  • Writing paper.
  • Resources on insects.

Procedure

  • Students will work individually.
  • Explain to students that the local newspaper is doing an entomology section in the paper. They want students to write an article on the most interesting, or creepy, insects out there!
  • Students will create a newspaper article including the following information:
    • At least one picture of this insect.
    • A great title/headline to capture the readers' attention.
    • 3-4 paragraphs describing the insect - physical traits, behavioral traits, habitat, and other interesting facts.
  • If resources are available, allow students the options of creating this article on the computer, by hand, or a combination of both.
  • Provide time for students to complete the necessary research and to compile their information.
  • Students will present their news articles to the class and place them on display.

Where Do Insects Live?

Students get to explore their creativity and demonstrate their knowledge of insect habitats with this diorama activity.

Materials

  • Shoe box.
  • Construction paper.
  • Crayons, colored pencils, markers.
  • Twigs, leaves, sand, dirt, and other materials that could be used for a habitat.
  • Clay or Play-Doh.
  • Glue.
  • Pictures of insects or plastic insects.
  • Access to computers to type a report.
    • Written report may be accepted if technology is not available.

Optional

  • Students could bring in some materials of their own.
    • Lego pieces, fake trees, figurines, etc.

Procedure

  • Students will work in groups of 2-3.
  • Explain that students will create their own insect habitat for species that reside in a specific ecosystem. Make sure that various types of ecosystems are covered. Examples: wetlands, rainforest, deciduous forest, desert, etc.
  • Allow groups of students to choose an ecosystem they would like to create or assign each group a specific ecosystem.
  • Provide time for students to discuss the types of materials they will need. Then, allow additional time for students to gather their materials if they are bringing in materials from home.
  • Students will work on their dioramas in class.
  • In addition to the dioramas, each group will compile a short report describing their insect habitat.
  • Reports must include the following information:
    • Description of the habitat.
    • Types of insects that live there.
    • Food that the insects thrive on.
    • Other interesting facts.
  • When projects are completed, students will share their reports and dioramas with the class. They may also put them on display in the hallway or classroom.

Entomology Games

Don't Bug Me, I'm Hunting!

Students get to compete with one another on a bug hunt in the classroom.

Materials

  • Pictures of insects.
    • Hide pictures around the classroom before students arrive.
  • Observation sheet to record name of species, physical characteristics, behavioral traits, and habitat.
  • Pencils.
  • Cups or containers to hold pictures of bugs.

Procedure

  • Students will compete in groups of 3-4.
  • Explain that groups get to compete to see who can capture the most insects from the classroom!
  • Groups will search and find a picture of an insect. As soon as they find a picture, they must correctly complete the observation sheet describing this insect.
  • After they record their facts about the insect, they will search for another insect.
  • Repeat searching, finding, and recording until all insects in the classroom have been found.
  • The group who captures the most insects and correctly describes them, wins!

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