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FABS Selling Technique: Explanation & Example

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  • 0:04 A Common Sales Techique
  • 1:12 Features
  • 1:53 Advantages
  • 2:11 Benefits Selling
  • 2:41 Utilizing the FABS Technique
  • 4:05 Lesson Summary
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Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Beth Hendricks

Beth holds a master's degree in integrated marketing communications, and has worked in journalism and marketing throughout her career.

Want to succeed at sales? Provide a FAB experience! In this lesson, we'll take a look at the FABS selling technique and how to use it to create a successful buying experience from start to finish.

A Common Sales Technique

Put yourself in Max's shoes. He's ventured into a local electronics store in search of a new computer. He doesn't really know exactly what he's looking for, so he finds a salesperson who presents the store's most popular option. The salesperson tells Max that this computer has a touchscreen as well as a keyboard, which enables greater mobility, an advantage that means Max can take this to work with him wherever he goes.

Because Max likes to travel but also stay connected, he's sold on the computer, makes the purchase, and takes his new computer home.

It might seem simple, but the sales technique employed by the electronics salesperson is a common strategy to help buyers see the features, advantages, and benefits of a particular product. It's a strategy known as FABS, an acronym for features, advantages and benefits selling.

This selling technique might sound silly at first, but if you think about any major purchase you've made lately—an appliance, furniture, electronic device, or automobile—it's likely a salesperson used this common technique to push you toward a purchase. And while that may sound underhanded, it's really not.

Let's take a closer look at the three main components of FABS: features, advantages, and benefits selling.

Features

The features of a product are pretty straightforward. It might be an icemaker in a refrigerator, a special cycle on a washing machine, or a moonroof on a car. In fact, most products have a list of features or characteristics that define a product or set it apart from a competing brand. For example, a new mattress might have a gel foam construction or a coffee maker might have a special espresso setting.

Customers frequently focus on product features that they want and may approach a sale with the idea that they want something specific, such as satellite radio in a new car. However, it isn't the feature specifically that the customer wants as much as the advantage it provides, like hundreds of channel options, or the benefits it offers, like access to the same stations wherever you're traveling.

Advantages

Advantages are how a product works or what it does for a customer. For Max, the touchscreen feature on his new computer eliminates the need for a keyboard. Other product advantages might be a sleeping bag made of material that keeps its user warm or a dual climate-control system in a vehicle that allows the driver and passenger to keep each side at its own temperature.

Benefits Selling

The benefits of a product are what most customers are really after. They might say they want a thick mattress pad for their bed, which is a feature, but what they're really telling you is that they want a better night's sleep.

The benefits portion of the FABS selling technique answers the question, ''What does this mean for me?'' for a consumer. Salespeople frequently focus on the benefits of a purchase rather than the features because most customers want to know what is in it for them. For example, a customer might be looking for a hybrid vehicle not because of the hybrid features as much as the idea that they want to save money on fuel costs.

Utilizing the FABS Technique

The FABS selling technique gives salespeople a structured method for walking customers through a purchase. Here's how it works:

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