Figurative Language in Tuck Everlasting

Instructor: Kerry Gray

Kerry has been a teacher and an administrator for more than twenty years. She has a Master of Education degree.

Authors, such as Natalie Babbitt, use figurative language to make their writing more interesting to the readers. In this lesson, we will learn about the use of figurative language in ''Tuck Everlasting''.

Producing Visual Images

Tuck Everlasting is the story of an oppressed little girl named Winnie who needs an adventure. She gets more than she bargained for when she meets the Tuck family that lives in the wood near her house. Many years ago, they drank from a spring that gave them everlasting life. Aware that it would be a problem if others found out about the spring, they kidnap Winnie when she discovers their secret. They don't want to hurt her, only to help her understand why it is so important for her to keep their secret. The author, Natalie Babbitt, uses figurative language throughout this fantastical tale to describe people, places, and events. Figurative language is the use of expressions that may produce visual images for the reader that go beyond the literal translations of words. Let's look at some examples of figurative language from the story.

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