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Fostering Creativity in the Workplace

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  • 0:03 Creativity in the Workplace
  • 0:48 Encourage Competition
  • 1:48 Avoid Negativity
  • 2:29 Reward Creativity
  • 3:03 Lesson Summary
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Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Amber Dixon

Amber works with graduate students enrolled in a virtual program and has a Master's of Social Work degree.

This lesson discusses the importance of creativity in the workplace. Learn how employers can encourage, promote, and reward employees to foster creativity.

Creativity in the Workplace

Employers generally strive for greater innovation in the workplace, and one way to acquire this is by encouraging creativity. There are many benefits of creativity among staff, such as improved problem-solving and productivity, increased motivation and morale, better workplace engagement and sense of team, and in turn, higher employee retention. A creative work environment is best accomplished when management is approachable and accepting of new viewpoints. When employees believe that management wants to hear their ideas, then staff are likely to generate more ideas. This can contribute to a more cutting-edge, innovative company overall.

Now, let's explore some techniques that employers use to foster creativity in the workplace, starting with encouraging competition.

Encourage Competition

If you've ever been on an employee retreat, you've probably engaged in team-building exercises, which aim to enhance trust and support among staff. Friendly competitions can provide a way for departments to strengthen their bond by taking on other departments. But competition isn't restricted to retreats - it's a useful tool in encouraging employees to do their best in the workplace. For instance, a company might ask workers to design a new logo or menu item, or even to choose a name for a new product or service. The employee with the most creative idea might win an extra week of vacation or bonus.

Let's look at an example. Say that Molly's boss called for departments throughout the company to think of ways to make the children's center office more inviting at minimal costs. While some departments suggested framed artwork or famous photographs of children, Molly's team had the most creative idea: to frame drawings and hand outlines by children of the company's employees. The boss rewarded Molly's team with a half-day of work the following Friday.

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