Frankenstein Creature Quotes

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  • 0:04 Rejected at Birth
  • 0:43 Creator vs. Creation
  • 2:23 Eternally Alone
  • 4:09 Revenge & Death
  • 5:52 Lesson Summary
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Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Kimberly Myers

Kimberly has taught college writing and rhetoric and has a master's degree in Comparative Literature.

This lesson is a collection of quotes from the creature in Mary Shelley's 'Frankenstein'. The quotes reveal how the monster feels about his own existence, about his creator, and about the world.

Rejected at Birth

Frankenstein's creature is bewildered to learn that his creator is horrified by him. This rejection from the person who could have guided him in the world greatly affects the creature. He wonders why he exists and why he is forever separated from companionship and understanding. These feelings progress from sadness and isolation to rage and a thirst for revenge. The creature's words reveal his deep existential confusion and sadness. An existential crisis is when someone questions the purpose, value, and meaning of his or her life. Let's look at some of the creature's own words.

Creator vs. Creation

The creature learns to read and tries to make sense of his life through stories, such as the creation story in the Bible. He compares Frankenstein creating him to God creating Adam, but he's angry that he was not given the opportunity for a relationship or sympathy from his creator. The creature wanted companionship and acceptance, but he finds that it is not possible because of the way he looks. Instead, he turns his creator into his archenemy.

Here, the creature describes how he felt after reading Frankenstein's journal entries about his creation.

''Everything is related. . . the minutest description of my odious and loathsome person is given, in language which painted your own horrors and rendered mine indelible. I sickened as I read....Why did you form a monster so hideous that even you turned from me in disgust?''

In these next two quotes, the creature confronts Frankenstein about his abandonment and tells Frankenstein that if he will never be loved, he will blot out love and happiness in Frankenstein's life.

''I remembered Adam's supplication to his Creator. But where was mine? He had abandoned me, and in the bitterness of my heart I cursed him.''

''I will revenge my injuries; if I cannot inspire love, I will cause fear, and chiefly towards you my archenemy, because my creator, do I swear inextinguishable hatred. . . I will work at your destruction, nor finish until I desolate your heart, so that you shall curse the hour of your birth.''

Eternally Alone

The creature begins with feelings of kindness toward humans, but he realizes that he will forever be separate from people because people will never accept him. All of the following quotes are of the creature speaking to Frankenstein.

''Shall I respect man when he condemns me? Let him live with me in the interchange of kindness, and instead of injury I would bestow every benefit upon him with tears of gratitude. . . But that cannot be.''

''I was, besides, endued with a figure hideously deformed and loathsome; I was not even of the same nature as man. . . When I looked around I saw and heard of none like me. Was I, then, a monster, a blot upon the earth, from which all men fled and whom all men disowned?''

Frankenstein's creature even rescues a young woman, and instead of being thanked, he is physically injured.

''This was then the reward of my benevolence! I had saved a human being from destruction, and as a recompense I now writhed under the miserable pain of a wound which shattered the flesh and bone. The feelings of kindness and gentleness which I had entertained but a few moments before gave place to hellish rage and gnashing of teeth.''

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