Copyright

Getting to Know Your New Customer

An error occurred trying to load this video.

Try refreshing the page, or contact customer support.

Coming up next: Using Surveys to Anticipate Customer Needs

You're on a roll. Keep up the good work!

Take Quiz Watch Next Lesson
 Replay
Your next lesson will play in 10 seconds
  • 0:00 Knowing Your Customers
  • 1:19 Learning About Your Customers
  • 2:15 Evaluating Feedback
  • 3:12 Lesson Summary
Save Save Save

Want to watch this again later?

Log in or sign up to add this lesson to a Custom Course.

Log in or Sign up

Timeline
Autoplay
Autoplay
Speed Speed Audio mode
Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Tara Schofield

Tara has a PhD in Marketing & Management

How can you be sure you're giving your customers the product and/or service they want? Getting to know your customers can help you know what they want, how to improve your business, and increase customer loyalty.

Knowing Your Customers

Customers are the lifeblood of your business. Getting to know your customers, including who they are and what they want, can be the difference between a company that struggles and one that is wildly successful. When customers feel appreciated and connected to your business, they'll support it by returning for future purchases and recommending you to their friends and family.

Imagine there are two new similar pizzerias in your neighborhood. Because you love pizza, you plan to go to both shops in the next week to see which one you prefer. You go to the first shop and find its pizza to be delicious. The flavors are well balanced, the servings are generous, and the prices are pretty low. However, the employees and owner are rude and don't care what you think of their pizza.

The next day you try the second shop, which is bright and attractive. While the prices are higher, you find the pizza to be as tasty. But what really catches your attention is the owner's interest in your opinions. The owner tries to understand what you want and like in your pizza, and welcomes your suggestions for the pizza shop. The owner demonstrates a desire to connect with you. As a result, you feel appreciated and loyal to the second shop. The higher prices don't bother you because you know you're getting a quality slice of pizza from someone who really cares about you as a customer.

Learning About Your Customers

Collecting and analyzing opinions is one way to learn about your customers. As in the previous example, you can do this by asking customers questions and engaging them in conversation. Some businesses conduct focus groups, where a random group of people is brought together and given a chance to experience the business' offerings before giving neutral feedback. For example, they may be given pizza, shown pictures of the pizzeria, and then asked for input.

To unlock this lesson you must be a Study.com Member.
Create your account

Register to view this lesson

Are you a student or a teacher?

Unlock Your Education

See for yourself why 30 million people use Study.com

Become a Study.com member and start learning now.
Become a Member  Back
What teachers are saying about Study.com
Try it risk-free for 30 days

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 200 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Create an account to start this course today
Try it risk-free for 30 days!
Create an account
Support