Global Workforce Planning & Development

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  • 0:02 A Global Workforce
  • 1:36 Planning & Development
  • 2:49 Lesson Summary
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Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Beth Loy

Dr. Loy has a Ph.D. in Resource Economics; master's degrees in economics, human resources, and safety; and has taught masters and doctorate level courses in statistics, research methods, economics, and management.

This lesson looks at how a company uses global workforce planning and development to transition into an international company. To go global, a company needs to invest in language fundamentals, cultural awareness, and expatriate skills.

A Global Workforce

Central Machining has been based solely in the United States in Oklahoma since 1950, but they recently purchased a small company in South Korea. The company specializes in military equipment repairs and chose Seoul as its first venture into the global economy. Now that the company has made this purchase, management wants to engage in global workforce development for those workers who will be sent to South Korea to kick start the expansion. Where does Central Machining start?

The globalization of a company takes a great deal of resources. A company like Central Machining needs to be good at what it does and have enough capital to invest in something considered very risky. Interacting in different markets with various currencies, laws, politics, languages, cultures, and customs can be overwhelming. This is why only the most secure companies with the best human resources should make this step.

Global workforce planning and development is the process of how a company effectively transitions its human resources to work in an international environment. Developing flexibility to work effectively across cultures and be a liaison among cultures will positively impact a business. Companies like Central Machining have to look at developing their human resources by training in language fundamentals, cultural awareness, and expatriate skills. Let's look at how we develop a workforce when it's going from a native to a global environment.

Planning & Development

Language is one of the key elements needed for Central Machining to make its transition. Even though most companies do business in English, there are times when people are more comfortable speaking in their primary language. When working in a foreign country, it's considered respectful to speak in the indigenous language. For example, if Central Machining wants to do business with the South Korean government, the company will have to hire translators to help with negotiations. The company should also seek out locals to fill new positions within the company.

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