Hortensio in The Taming of the Shrew

Instructor: John Gonzales

John has 20+ years experience teaching at the college level in areas that include English and American literature, Humanities, and Interdisciplinary Studies.

Get acquainted with the character Hortensio from Shakespeare's ''The Taming of the Shrew.'' Hortensio doesn't get the girl, but then he does, but he still doesn't get what he thought he was getting. Sound intriguing? Read on.

Hortensio's Great Expectations

In your typical contemporary romantic comedy, getting the girl is what makes the ending happy for both the girl-getting guy and the audience. This is especially the rule when the guy experiences a transformative realization, and stops chasing the pretty, popular girl so that he can be with the nice girl who has been waiting in the wings all along. It's not particularly enlightened, but it's a tried and true formula.

While Hortensio in Shakespeare's play The Taming of the Shrew is not the primary girl-getter, he does seem to be operating according to the formula through most of the play. Shakespeare likes to mess with his audience's expectations though, and he accomplishes this by messing with Hortensio's all the way through to the conclusion.

Becoming a Tutor/Suitor

As the main action of the play opens, Hortensio is presented as both a character and a representative of public opinion. Like pretty much every man in Padua, it seems, Hortensio adores Bianca and is both intimidated and revolted by her older sister Katherina, the shrew of the title. When both girls' father, Baptista, publicly declares that he will not allow Bianca to marry until Katherina does, Hortensio conspires with his arch-rival, Gremio, to find a husband for Katherina.

Gremio is skeptical that anyone would be fool enough to marry a she-devil, but Hortensio assures him that the man is out there who will tolerate Katherina for the money Baptista offers as dowry. They agree to work together, and as luck and coincidence would have it--the kind of luck and coincidence that are entirely expected in comedies--the answer appears at Hortensio's door.

Hortensio Disguised as Litio
Hortensio

To his credit, when his old friend Petruchio stops by to say hello while on his way to see the world, seek his fortune, and find a wife, Hortensio is honest with him about Katherina's down side. Petruchio is unfazed and keenly interested in her; it all seems to be going Hortensio's way. He has a plan to sneak in under Gremio's nose and get close to Bianca by posing as a music tutor for Baptista's daughters. Petruchio will stop by to pay his respects, Baptista being an old family friend, and present Hortensio as Litio, the tutor, and declare his intent to court Katherina.

It all goes as planned with one exception--well, two if you count Katherina breaking a lute over Hortensio's head--someone else is tutoring and wooing in undercover mode as well! A dashing young visitor, Lucentio, has also fallen madly in love with Bianca, and has convinced Gremio to recommend him to Baptista in the disguise of Cambio. As it turns out, Bianca only has eyes for Lucentio.

Hortensio's Encounter with Irony

It takes a while, but Hortensio finally realizes that he stands no chance with Bianca and turns over a new leaf: 'Kindness in women, not their beauteous looks,/shall win my love.' He will court an unnamed widow (a character we have yet to meet in the play), who has apparently loved him all along, instead.

What Hortensio doesn't know is that the gossip he heard from Tranio (Lucentio's servant, masquerading as Lucentio while Lucentio masquerades as Cambio) that helped influence his decision wasn't entirely true. This is an example of dramatic irony, when the audience is aware of situations and subplots that influence characters without their own full knowledge.

To unlock this lesson you must be a Study.com Member.
Create your account

Register for a free trial

Are you a student or a teacher?

Unlock Your Education

See for yourself why 30 million people use Study.com

Become a Study.com member and start learning now.
Become a Member  Back
What teachers are saying about Study.com
Free 5-day trial

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 160 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Create an account to start this course today
Try it free for 5 days!
Create An Account
Support