How to Create Labels in Microsoft Word

Instructor: Dr. Douglas Hawks

Douglas has two master's degrees (MPA & MBA) and a PhD in Higher Education Administration.

While the most popular use for Microsoft Word may be writing memos, reports, or essays, Word has many other useful features. In this lesson, we'll discuss how you can use Word to print labels for mailing, filing, or other uses.

Mailings Menu

In the most recent version of Microsoft Office, one of the menus available at the top of the screen is called 'Mailings.' When selected, this menu gives the user a number of options related to designing or typing out envelopes and labels, including a method called mail merge where addresses or information stored in a database, such as Microsoft Excel, can be imported in to create a large number of labels.

We won't be covering mail merge in this lesson, so let's walk through how you would create labels if you had a stack of handwritten addresses or if you were using a single address for a number of labels.

Labels Dialog Box

After you've clicked the Mailings Menu, the second button on that menu or ribbon is the labels button. When you single-click that button, a dialog box will open with a number of options and buttons that you can use to design the labels you need.

The first step is to click the options button. Since you will be printing these labels directly onto sheets of adhesive labels, you need to make sure the format of the document lines up with the format and size of your sheet of labels. Microsoft has preloaded templates for over thirty brands of label makers with hundreds of options for each label. Somewhere on your package of labels, there is almost a guaranteed note that says something to the effect of ''Use Word template #85560 for these labels.'' This tells you which option to select when you are creating the labels.

For our example, let's use 'Avery US Letter' as the selection for the pull-down menu called 'Label vendors.' When you select that option, the 'Product Number' list changes to reflect just the templates for your vendor selection. The product numbers are in numeric order, so you can find the product number that matches the number you are given on your package of labels. In our case, find #85560 - Easy Peel Address Labels.

In that same 'label options' dialog box, there are a few other selections you can make although it is rare you will ever use them. The printing information is based on your printer, but almost all home and work printers are page printers. You can, however, select a specific tray on your printer if the sheet of blank labels you are printing on is in a specific tray. You can also select the 'Details' button, and it will show you the margins, spacing, and other formatting for your sheet. Finally, if you can't find the template for your labels in the dropdown menus, you can create a new label by selecting 'New Label.' This will almost never happen since Microsoft is constantly updating their lists as new sizes and formats of labels hit the market.

Clicking 'Okay' will take you back to the dialog box.

Other 'Label' Options

When you are back on the original 'Label' dialog box, there are a few more options you may be able to use. First, if you want a return address, you can click the box in the upper-right hand corner, and then type in a return address. If you are only using a single 'to' address, you can enter it in the 'Address' textbox. If you are trying to create a number of individual labels, you'll need to do that in the document you create through the dialog box.

Under the 'Print' section, you can print a single label instead of a full page if that's what you want. If you have a half of sheet of labels and the next single label you want to print is on the second row and the fourth column, you can choose that option, select the row and column, and your single label will print at that location on your page.

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