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How to Create Partnerships with the Local Community

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  • 0:00 Building Partnerships
  • 0:41 Libraries
  • 1:27 Theaters and Museums
  • 2:23 Restaurants
  • 3:42 Other Businesses
  • 4:48 Lesson Summary
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Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Kevin Newton

Kevin has edited encyclopedias, taught middle and high school history, and has a master's degree in Islamic law.

One of the most useful things that a school can do is build partnerships within the community. In this lesson, we look at how to build those partnerships with businesses and nonprofits.

Building Partnerships

One of the best long-term relationships that can be built within a community is between local businesses and schools. After all, better schools mean a higher likelihood of wealthier customers in the future! That said, that's not all that can be gained from these partnerships. Students can intrinsically learn the importance of the education that they are gaining in class in order to have the jobs they want to have in the future. In this lesson, we're going to take a look at how to build those relationships, as well as some examples of how such relationships have been beneficial for communities, schools, and students.

Libraries

Perhaps the easiest relationship to imagine is between schools and libraries. After all, both places are seemingly obsessed with education! There are so many examples of successful partnerships between schools and libraries that it's hard to describe just a handful. Still, some very big generalities can be made. One of the most obvious partnerships is the efforts taken by libraries during the summer to encourage reading. Many libraries do this, and schools encourage their students to go.

However, that's not the only relationship that is possible. Many of these can be targeted at student success. Libraries can be a valuable source of free tutoring and test prep. Additionally, they can run after-school programs that help encourage students to enjoy reading, and also give them a structured time in which to do homework.

Theaters and Museums

Speaking of after-school programs, those run by theaters and museums work well. At their highest level, theaters and museums offer a real manifestation of much of what people study in class. Is there really a better way to make studying dinosaurs come alive than to get to see the bones? The same could be said for more purely scientific or historical museums.

So, what about theaters and playhouses - what can they offer students? In short, the partnerships between these establishments and schools can not only help build an appreciation for the language arts and performing arts, but also for so many of the soft skills that schools must inherently teach. Self-control is essential for the theater, as is self-confidence. After all, it takes people pretty sure of themselves to stand and sing in front of a crowd that paid money to watch them do it! By building partnerships, schools build the visibility of these outlets.

Restaurants

So far, we've looked mainly at pretty education-focused entities. After all, if people weren't educated it is likely that these types of organizations would suffer.

So, what about restaurants? Immediately when I think of restaurants, I think of the important partnerships based on reading that some franchises have established with schools to encourage reading. Perhaps the most famous is the Pizza Hut Book It! Program. From a completely pragmatic point, what better way for a pizza company to build a customer base than rewarding students who read with free pizza? However, the fact is that the program has worked wonders. In the more than 30 years it has been in existence, it has really motivated kids to read.

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