How to Order & Compare Numbers to 999,999,999: Lesson for Kids

An error occurred trying to load this video.

Try refreshing the page, or contact customer support.

Coming up next: How to Compare Integers

You're on a roll. Keep up the good work!

Take Quiz Watch Next Lesson
 Replay
Your next lesson will play in 10 seconds
  • 0:04 Comparing and Ordering
  • 1:23 Count the Digits
  • 2:59 Compare Place Values
  • 5:04 Lesson Summary
Save Save Save

Want to watch this again later?

Log in or sign up to add this lesson to a Custom Course.

Log in or Sign up

Timeline
Autoplay
Autoplay
Speed Speed

Recommended Lessons and Courses for You

Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Heather Jenkins

Heather has a bachelor's degree in elementary education and a master's degree in special education. She was a public school teacher and administrator for 11 years.

When you are working with numbers, it's important to be able to compare the value of two or more numbers. In this lesson, you will learn how to order and compare numbers by using the terms greater than, less than, and equal to.

Comparing and Ordering

Do you want to visit the candy factory in Willy Wonka and the Chocolate Factory? Just imagine all the free candy, the chocolate river, and those cheery Oompa Loompas. People who run candy factories often have to compare numbers to see what candies are the most popular.

You can compare any group of numbers, including candy sales, by using three different terms. Each of these terms comes with a special symbol:

  • The symbol > means greater than
    • 35 lollipops > 4 chocolates
  • The symbol < means less than
    • 5 hard candies < 24 gumdrops
  • The symbol = means equal to
    • 18 candy bars = 18 pieces of licorice

Let's imagine that we sold all of those candies. If we made a list of the candy sales in order from the smallest amount sold to the biggest amount sold, it would look like this:

4 chocolates, 5 hard candies, 18 candy bars, 18 pieces of licorice, 24 gumdrops, 35 lollipops
or
4, 5, 18, 18, 24, 35

These are pretty small numbers. Let's explore how to compare and order larger numbers.

Count the Digits

When comparing two or more numbers, you should first count the number of digits in each number.

Whole numbers with more digits in them are greater than numbers with fewer digits. This is because the more digits a whole number has, the more place values it includes and the larger the number becomes.

Look at the example of the total candies sold by the Willy Wonka Chocolate Factory this year.


chart


Let's find the least popular candy by looking for the number with the least amount of digits.

Our chart says that 146 lollipops were sold. This number is 3 digits long and the other numbers have more digits, so this is our smallest number. Its largest number is in the hundreds place.

The next most popular seller is rock candy, with 23,504. This number has 5 digits, with the highest place value being the ten thousands.

Finally, the most popular seller and greatest number is gummy worms at 458,605,495. This number has 9 digits, with the highest place value being the hundred millions.

To unlock this lesson you must be a Study.com Member.
Create your account

Register to view this lesson

Are you a student or a teacher?

Unlock Your Education

See for yourself why 30 million people use Study.com

Become a Study.com member and start learning now.
Become a Member  Back
What teachers are saying about Study.com
Try it risk-free for 30 days

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 200 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Create an account to start this course today
Try it risk-free for 30 days!
Create an account
Support