How to Write a Resignation Letter: Formation & Sample

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  • 0:05 Why Write a…
  • 1:04 Writing a Resignation Letter
  • 2:52 Resignation Letter Template
  • 3:33 Lesson Summary
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Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Charles Kinney, Jr.
There is a right way and many wrong ways to write a resignation. In this lesson, you will learn how to form a good resignation letter and see samples of resignation letters for both email and when writing a paper resignation letter.

Why Write a Resignation Letter?

You've found your dream job, and it's time to move on! The company you work for is the worst. Bad pay, bad conditions, even the toilet paper in the company restroom is bad! You decide to write your letter of resignation and give the people who made your life so miserable for years a piece of your mind. Take this job and. . . wait a second. That's not the way to write a good letter of resignation! In this lesson, we'll look at the right way to resign from a position.

You want to leave your present employer as a friend. No matter how badly they treated you or how much you disliked a workplace, burning a bridge will probably hurt you in the future.

When you write a resignation letter and attach your signature, it's a legal document that says you will no longer be working for your employer, and it's understood that they will no longer be paying you. The letter will go into your personnel file and could be used when future employers call your former employer for a reference. That's why it is important to know how to write a good resignation letter.

Writing a Resignation Letter

Rule 1 when writing a resignation letter is to keep it simple. Be polite, but also direct and to the point. If it's a paper letter, your address and the address of the company should be included at the top of the letter. Clearly write the date that you're submitting the letter as well. Open by stating that you're leaving the company or organization and give clear dates as to when you're leaving, complying with your company or organization's notification period. This changes by job and country, but most employers in the United States ask for 30 days notice.

While you might want to note your new position or discuss your reasons for leaving, this isn't necessary and usually complicates the letter. Also, no matter how bad the experience was, thank your employer for their time. Again, this is not an opportunity to passive-aggressively attack the company (For example: ''It has been so wonderful working here, and I cannot wait to get out of here.'') Be sincere. Additionally, offer assistance during the transition period. Even though you're leaving, you're still employed by the company, and this builds goodwill for the future.

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