How to Write Amounts of Money: Lesson for Kids

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  • 0:04 Amounts of Money
  • 0:21 Not Quite a Dollar
  • 1:32 One Dollar or More
  • 2:34 Lesson Summary
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Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Heather Jenkins

Heather has a bachelor's degree in elementary education and a master's degree in special education. She was a public school teacher and administrator for 11 years.

We use money every day, so it's important to understand how to communicate about money. In this lesson, you will learn different ways to write different amounts of money.

Amounts of Money

Have you ever sold anything? Let's say that you are having a yard sale and you want to sell your collection of rubber boogers. You decide to sell them for a quarter each. When you start to make your sign to let customers know the price, you are unsure about what to write.

How do you write this amount of money? Let's find out!

Not Quite a Dollar

So, your boogers are worth a quarter each...the rubber kind you're selling, not the ones from your nose. Gross! A quarter is worth 25 cents, so how do we write that?

Most often, amounts of money that are less than 100 cents, or 1 dollar, are written in one of three different ways:

Cent Sign

You can write the amount of cents by writing the value of the coins and adding a cent sign (¢) after it. This shows that the amount of money is made up of coins less than 1 dollar.

  • Rubber boogers - 25¢ each

Dollar Sign/Decimal

You can write the amount of the cents by writing the value of the coins and adding a decimal point to the left of it. A decimal point shows that the numbers following it are a part of a whole number, in this case, parts of a dollar.

To the left of the decimal point, you would put a dollar sign ($), which shows that the numbers following the sign are units of money. If you want, you can put a 0 in front of the decimal to show there are no dollars.

  • Rubber boogers - $.25 each OR $0.25 each

Words

You can write the amount of money in words by writing the number and then the word 'cents.'

  • Rubber boogers - 25 cents OR twenty-five cents

Different ways to write cents
boogers

Even though the boogers are 25¢, I'm not sure if anyone will ''pick'' them.

One Dollar or More

Wait a minute! You forgot the custom-made, super-sticky, imitation earwax balls you got last year, so you decide to sell them at the yard sale as well. You want to sell each ball for a dollar and 2 quarters. This is more than a dollar, so how will you do it?

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