Interposition in Psychology: Definition & Examples

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  • 0:01 Depth Perception
  • 1:30 Examples of Interposition
  • 2:53 Lesson Summary
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Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Yolanda Williams

Yolanda has taught college Psychology and Ethics, and has a doctorate of philosophy in counselor education and supervision.

Interposition occurs in instances where one object overlaps the other, which causes us to perceive depth. Learn more about interposition, depth perception, monocular cues, and more.

Depth Perception

Interposition occurs in instances where one object overlaps the other, which causes us to perceive depth. Learn more about interposition, depth perception, monocular cues, and more.

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Look at this image. How would you describe it? If asked, most people would describe this image as a cube, which is a 3-dimensional figure. There are not many people who would see the image as two squares connected by a series of lines, which is how I created the image. Have you ever wondered how it is possible for us to perceive a 3-dimensional figure on a flat surface, such as a piece of paper or a computer screen? It's due to depth perception, or the ability to use visual cues in order to perceive the distance or 3-dimensional characteristics of an object.

Interposition, or overlapping, is a type of monocular cue in which one object partially covers another. It creates the appearance that the object that is being covered, or overlapped, is the one that is further away. A monocular cue is any stimuli related to depth perception that can be perceived through the use of one eye alone. This is in contrast to binocular cues, which require the use of both eyes to perceive depth.

Examples of Interposition

Take a look at these triangles. This image contains an example of an interposition.

interposition

Which of the two triangles in this picture do you think is the closest to you? Which one do you think is further away?

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