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Developmental Psychology: Definition, Theorists & Types of Growth

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  • 0:00 Jean Piaget
  • 0:54 Developmental Psychology
  • 1:37 Continuities
  • 3:21 Lesson Summary
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Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Paul Bautista
Why do we study psychological development? People change over their lifetimes, and developmental psychology helps us explore what changes and what stays the same. Learn about some of the big names in this field whose work and theories you'll explore in other lessons

Did you know that, when you leave a 5-month-old in its crib and leave the room, the baby probably thinks you've literally disappeared? Very young babies don't understand that the people and objects they observe in the world exist even when unseen. Why do babies make this mistake? When do they begin to understand that their parents do not disappear when they leave the room?

Questions like these belong to the field of developmental psychology, pioneered by Swiss psychologist Jean Piaget (1896-1980). In the years immediately following WWI, Piaget was teaching at a school in Paris. There, he became involved in scoring some of the first intelligence tests, and noticed that children tended to provide similar reasoning for their wrong answers. Intrigued by this, Piaget eventually moved back to Switzerland and studied how intelligence develops in children.

Piaget pioneered developmental psychology
Jean Piaget pioneer

Developmental psychology is the study of how we change over our lifespans. Physical, intellectual, and emotional growth all contribute to psychological development. Physical changes during prenatal development, like exposure to alcohol, can have long-lasting cognitive consequences; not being able to feel love from parents and form attachments can result in social impairments. We'll look at studies designed to investigate these kinds of relationships, as well as at several theories of developmental stages proposed by Piaget and by other psychologists Erik Erikson and Lawrence Kohlberg. Piaget focused mainly on cognitive changes; Erikson on changes in motivations; and Kohlberg on changes in moral thinking.

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