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Kickball Lesson Plan for Physical Education

Instructor: John Hamilton

John has tutored algebra and SAT Prep and has a B.A. degree with a major in psychology and a minor in mathematics from Christopher Newport University.

This lesson plan will educate your students about the exciting game of kickball. They will learn about the rules and fundamentals of the game, as well as six of the main required skills.

Learning Objectives

After studying this lesson, your students will be able to:

  • Explain how to play and the basic rules of the game of kickball
  • Apply the skills and techniques used to play the game

Length

1-1.5 Hours

Materials

  • Kickball
  • Outdoor field or gymnasium
  • Preprinted worksheets with the official kickball rules (optional)

Key Vocabulary

  • Bunt
  • Fly ball out
  • Force out
  • Foul ball
  • Home run
  • Strikeout
  • Tag out

Curriculum Standards

Please note that each state has different standards for physical education. Please consult your state's standards to ensure proper alignment.

Instructions

  • Inform your students they will be learning about the exciting and fun sport of kickball.
  • Ask them if anyone has played kickball before?
  • Hold up the kickball. The red rubber ball is often preferred, but one used for dodgeball or volleyball is also acceptable.
  • Explain to your students that kickball is a team game with rules similar to baseball. There are innings, and teams try to get hits, run around the bases, and eventually score runs. The team with the most runs at the end of the game is the winner.
  • Review the vocabulary terms that may be unfamiliar to students.
  • Explain to students that there are 6 skills involved in playing kickball and they are kicking, throwing, catching, fielding, pitching, and running.
  • Have your students practice some of the skills before attempting to play an actual game.
  • To warm up, jog the bases. Start at home plate and run to first base and then jog to second base, third base, and finally back to home base. Do this three times.
  • Now that we know how to run the bases, we will practice pitching the ball.
  • Divide students into 3 groups. Show each group the skills they will be practicing.

Group 1 are the Fielders

  • Have this group line up along the infield. For now, they won't take their actual positions but will take positions along the infield to practice fielding the ball.
  • Explain that fielders try to catch or scoop up the ball and have the following ways to get a runner out.
  1. If they have caught a kicked ball in the air, this is a fly ball out, and the runner is out. But if there were other runners on base, or if they scooped up the ball, then they have choices about what to do next.
  2. Runners can be tagged out by hitting them with the ball, and this is called a tag out. Remind players that they cannot hit people in the head with the ball.
  3. Runners are also out when a fielder throws the ball to the teammate on that base who will then tag the runner before they get to the base and this is also called a tag out.
  4. A force out is a situation that occurs when a fielder throws the ball to a base before the runner arrives at that base and the runner cannot return to the previous base because a teammate is now there. In this situation, the fielder only has to tag the base, and the runner is considered out.
  • For younger players, you can ignore the force out and make the rules so that runners are out with fly outs, by hitting runners with the ball, or tagging them with the ball before they touch the base.

Group 2 are the Pitchers

  • Have this group line up at the pitcher's mound and have them practice rolling the ball so it goes over home plate.
  • Stand near the pitcher's mound and roll the ball underhand, so it travels smoothly along the ground toward the kicker at home plate.
  • Some schools play with rules that the pitcher can put spin on the ball, or even bounce the ball. However, remember this could actually backfire and benefit the kicker.

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