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Life Cycle of a Rabbit: Lesson for Kids

Life Cycle of a Rabbit: Lesson for Kids
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  • 0:00 Rabbits & Kittens
  • 1:11 Young Adult & Middle…
  • 1:42 Geriatric Rabbits
  • 2:12 Lesson Summary
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Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Mary Grace Miller

Mary Grace has taught first grade for 8 years and has a Bachelor's degree in Elementary Education and is licensed in ESL.

This lesson will teach you about the life cycle of a rabbit. You'll learn about the four main stages of a rabbit's life: baby, young adult, middle age, and geriatric, and what rabbits are like at each of these life stages.

Rabbits and Kittens

Rabbits are mammals, which means that they have fur, are warm-blooded, and give birth to live babies. There are lots of different kinds of rabbits, and rabbits can be pets or live on their own in the wild.

A rabbit is considered a baby until it is 1 year old. Did you know that baby rabbits are called kittens? Kittens look very different from adult rabbits when they are first born. Their ears and eyes are closed, and they have much less fur. They cannot do anything without their mothers for the first 3 weeks of their lives. When kittens are about a week old, their fur starts to grow. They usually open their eyes when they are 10 days old and their ears when they are 12 days old.

Kittens drink milk from their mothers until they are 3 to 5 weeks old. After that, they can eat their own solid food and they are ready to leave the nest. When they are 6 to 8 weeks old, kittens don't need their mothers at all anymore. When kittens are between 4 and 6 months old, they are able to breed, or have babies of their own. Rabbits usually grow to their adult weight when they are between 10 and 14 months old.

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