Little Red Riding Hood Activities

Instructor: Heather Jenkins

Heather has a bachelor's degree in elementary education and a master's degree in special education. She was a public school teacher and administrator for 11 years.

'Little Red Riding Hood' is a beloved fairy tale that most students grow up reading. Use these activities to help students delve deeper into the popular story and look at it from different perspectives.

Studying Little Red Riding Hood

Little Red Riding Hood is a classic tale that has entertained children for many years ... and probably made a few kids take a second glance at their grandmothers to make sure they weren't really wolves! Studying this story lets students examine story elements, plot, theme and point of view, among other concepts of literature. Let's look at some activities to help students further explore Little Red Riding Hood.

Multicultural Compare and Contrast

Use this activity to help students compare multicultural versions of the original Little Red Riding Hood story.

Materials

  • Copies of Little Red Riding Hood by the Brothers Grimm
  • Copies of versions of Little Red Riding Hood from different countries (France, Italy, Asia, etc.)
  • Chart paper
  • Markers

Teacher Directions

  1. Provide students with copies of Little Red Riding Hood by the Brothers Grimm. Discuss the history of the story. Have the class take turns reading the story aloud.
  2. Tell the class that other versions of the story were written in different countries.
  3. Divide the class into pairs.
  4. Give each pair chart paper, markers, and copies of a version of Little Red Riding Hood from another country.
  5. Have students read their assigned version of the story and create a Venn diagram to compare it to the Brothers Grimm version.
  6. When students are finished, have them share their Venn diagrams with the class.

Discussion Questions

  • What details of the story were the same throughout the different versions of Little Red Riding Hood?
  • Why do you think versions of the same story were being told all over the world?

From Your Perspective

Include this activity to help your students examine point of view and how it contributes to Little Red Riding Hood.

Materials

  • Copies of Little Red Riding Hood
  • Chart paper
  • Markers

Teacher Directions

  1. Provide students with copies of Little Red Riding Hood to read. Discuss with the class the point of view from which the story is told (most versions are told from third-person omniscient).
  2. Have the class brainstorm how the story might read differently if another character from it was telling the story.
  3. Divide the class into pairs, and provide each pair with chart paper and markers.
  4. Assign each pair a character from the story, such as grandma, the wolf, or the woodcutter.
  5. On the chart paper, have students rewrite a scene from the story from their character's point of view. The events of the scene shouldn't change, but encourage students to add insight, emotions, or thoughts from the character as he/she experiences the action. For example, when Little Red confronts the wolf about looking like her grandmother and he threatens to eat her, the wolf might have thought he was acting out of self-defense because Little Red looked ready to swing her basket of goodies at his head.
  6. When students are finished, have them share their stories with the class.

Discussion Questions

  • How did the story change when you wrote it from another point of view?
  • What is the benefit to reading a story, like Little Red Riding Hood, when it is written from the third-person omniscient point of view? What was the benefit to reading your stories written from the first-person point of view?

Fractured Fairy Tales

This activity will have students creating and acting out their own slightly altered versions of Little Red Riding Hood.

Materials

  • Fractured fairy tales for Little Red Riding Hood (Examples: Ninja Red Riding Hood by Corey Rosen Schwartz; 'Little Red Running Shorts' from The Stinky Cheese Man and Other Fairly Stupid Tales by John Scieszka)

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