Making Inferences Games & Activities

Instructor: David Wood

David has taught Honors Physics, AP Physics, IB Physics and general science courses. He has a Masters in Education, and a Bachelors in Physics.

Inferences are important in many areas of life: everyday life, science, literature, and more. Help students practice making inferences by implementing one of these games and activities in your classroom.

Making Inferences Games and Activities

Learning about inferences is valuable on many levels. Not only is it an important scientific skill, and something everyone should learn about in science class, it's also useful far beyond science. People will often say things that have undertones or deeper meanings, and this is true in both life and literature. In fact, every day we have to make inferences all the time - dark clouds approaching suggest that rain might be coming. If we weren't able to make these kinds of inferences, we will make far poorer choices.

Teaching inferences can be more than dull and boring and can actually be super engaging. One way to make learning about inference engaging is by having students play games and take part in activities. Here are just a few examples of activities and games that will help in teaching about inferences.

Inference Detectives

For this activity, split students into groups, and give each group an envelope full of clues and evidence. Students might be investigating a crime, or trying to figure out something more mundane. Clues could involve receipts, phone bills, photos or drawings, statements from witnesses, or anything else you can think of. Students must use the clues and evidence they have to make an inference about what really occurred. Depending on how creative you are with the evidence, the activity can be a lot of fun for students as they act out the role of real-life detectives.

Inferences Art

One of the classic kinds of inference questions students may have to answer involves looking at a picture, and inferring what is going on based on little clues they can see in that picture. We can reverse this activity and make it more creative by having our students produce inferences art.

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