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Marketing Environment: Internal Influences on Marketing Strategy

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  • 0:00 Internal vs. External…
  • 0:50 Quality of Good
  • 2:01 Practicality of Campaign
  • 2:49 Corporate Objectives
  • 3:53 Lesson Summary
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Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Kevin Newton

Kevin has edited encyclopedias, taught middle and high school history, and has a master's degree in Islamic law.

Sometimes the absolute best marketing plans run into problems. Occasionally, those problems come from within the company. In this lesson, we'll take a look at internal influences on marketing strategy.

Internal vs. External Influences

Let's face it. Few companies advertise using words like 'nifty' or 'far out' any more. Nor do companies that seek to reach the 18-35 demographic spend too much time advertising in newspapers or on the news, even though those were once viable ways to reach an audience. Truly, marketing is vulnerable to external influences of style and technology.

However, marketing is also very vulnerable to internal influences that are present in every company. From the ideals of the managers to the simple practicality of the product's use, much of what guides the marketing department comes from the company itself. In many ways, these internal influences can often shape marketing strategy in a much more noticeable way than external influences. In this lesson, we're going to take a look at many of these internal influences of marketing.

Quality of Good

A marketing campaign is only as good as the company behind it. Let's say that you've come up with a perfect plan, but your product is absolutely worthless. Well, maybe worthless is a little harsh, but your marketing campaign has to match the demographic that your good is targeted towards.

A marketing campaign for a first-person shooter console game likely would not benefit from being targeted to the retired crowd. Likewise, estate-planning services would be largely wasted on the energy drink-consuming gamer set. In short, the quality of the good, meaning both the value of the good and its value to a target set of consumers, matters greatly.

Still, it's not just a question of the right good but making sure that you can compete within that demographic. Let's look at our groups of gamers and retirees and give them something they'd both want - vacations. If your company offers travel planning with a no-strings-attached mindset, you won't be able to compete with the retirees, who have come to expect a certain level of quality for their money. Likewise, if you offer only luxury services, you'll be too expensive for the gamer set that is backpacking Europe for the first time.

Practicality of Campaign

You've got an amazing marketing campaign planned. There's just one problem. You can't pull it off. The practicality of the campaign, or your company's ability to actually perform the work, is a very important internal influence on any marketing campaign. You could have the most aggressive marketing campaign imaginable, but if your total marketing budget is only five hundred dollars, then your campaign remains only an idea.

You've constantly got to make sure that the planned implementation matches actual abilities. This does not just mean financial abilities, although the ability to pay for a marketing campaign is an important part of the equation. If you are the extent of the marketing department, or worse, if your marketing department is rather inept, then you stand no chance of being able to succeed with your objectives.

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