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Marketing in Veterinary Medicine Video

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  • 0:01 Marketing
  • 0:35 The Four Ps of Marketing
  • 2:06 Signature Service
  • 3:08 Internal vs. External…
  • 4:07 Lesson Summary
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Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Artem Cheprasov
This lesson covers the very basics of marketing used in veterinary medicine. We'll define marketing, discuss the four P's of marketing, and delineate external versus internal marketing.

Marketing

What makes you unique? Is it your funky hair? Your witty humor? Did you invent something cool?

Using your unique attributes is one great way to set yourself apart from others, and we do this all the time. For example, we try to make our resumes look unique so that we can stand out during a job application.

Emphasizing uniqueness is one part of the strategies involved in marketing, a set of activities, including advertising, which try to get consumers to buy a service or product.

Let's see how marketing is used in veterinary medicine, and how the four P's of marketing can help promote your clinic.

The Four P's of Marketing

When marketing any product, first consider the four P's of marketing for maximum effectiveness.

First, we've got product. The product, or service, that is being offered should be in demand. If clients don't want it or very few do, it may not be worth offering or advertising it, otherwise it'll be a waste of money.

Next, we've got place. If your clinic offers the most advanced orthopedic surgical techniques but is located 100 miles from nowhere, then this isn't a very convenient location for clientele, is it?

Third, we've got price. Pricing should be competitive. If one clinic offers the same quality procedure for half of what your clinic offers, clients will eventually catch on. However, you should not sacrifice price just because someone else charges less. It's important to look deeper.

Often, cheaper services may not use the best equipment or medication, and so you can emphasize that your quality of care is much higher, which leads to fewer costly complications and pain for animals down the line. This will allow you to charge more for a higher-quality service.

And finally, we've got promotion. This is the way you promote the products or services that are offered by the clinic. This can include advertisements online or offline, a nice and accessible website design, newsletters, and many more. If you don't promote your product and place, then it will take much longer for people to learn about what you offer through word of mouth alone.

Signature Service

In veterinary medicine, a good rule of thumb is that two to three percent of the monthly budget should be reserved for marketing. Since there may be local clinics in the neighborhood, it's important to determine what makes a practice unique in order to market it to the community wisely, so as not to waste the monthly budget.

For example, the practice you work at may have a very friendly, family-like atmosphere. Maybe it offers extended clinic hours for busy working professionals. Perhaps you offer the latest and greatest in medicine and surgery. There can be many qualities that can be emphasized and advertised to the community to bring in clientele.

In some cases, your clinic may even have what's called a signature service, a service that is completely unique to a practice. As an example, perhaps the clinic offers special diet seminars once a month or gives puppy-training classes once a week. Signature services should always be emphasized via pamphlets, newsletters, or advertisements, so the local population knows about them, and through that, your clinic.

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