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Matilda Writing Prompts

Instructor: Clio Stearns

Clio has taught education courses at the college level and has a Ph.D. in curriculum and instruction.

Roald Dahl's 'Matilda' can be an engaging and meaningful text for students. This lesson offers some writing prompts to help them process their work with the novel.

Why Matilda Writing Prompts?

Are your students reading Roald Dahl's Matilda? Are you wondering how to help them engage more deeply with the text? If so, maybe you want to get them writing about the book and the connections they have made to it. Matilda is a wonderful novel for the upper elementary reader. It deals with themes like the place of the individual in the family, relationships between adults and children, and what it means to be exceptional. It is also a classic Roald Dahl novel in that at times it can be gruesome and ridiculous. One way to get your students thinking and writing about Matilda is by offering them writing prompts. Writing prompts can function as idea starters for your students. These prompts get them going without doing too much of the thinking and working for them. The prompts in this lesson are designed to get your students more deeply involved in their work with Matilda.

Prompts About Characters

The prompts in this section help your students think about the characters in the novel.

  • Imagine you are friends with Matilda and you want to describe her to your parents. Write an introduction that tells your family who this girl is and what she is like.
  • Write a complaint letter from the point of view of one of Mr. Wormstead's clients. In the letter, write about the things he does at work and also his overall personality and character.
  • Pretend that you are hoping to help Ms. Honey get a job at a different school. Write a recommendation that explains what she is like, what makes her special, and what kind of person or teacher she is.
  • Imagine that you are Mrs. Trunchbull. Write a statement from your own point of view explaining your reasoning for why you do the terrible things you do at school.

Prompts About Plot

The prompts in this section will help your students become more engaged in the novel's plot and express their comprehension.

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