Men in Ancient Greece Lesson for Kids

Instructor: Jenna Scifo

Jenna has 14 years of experience teaching elementary students and has a master's degree in Teaching and Learning.

Have you ever wondered what men of ancient Greece were like? In this lesson, you will gain a better understanding of how ancient Greek men lived, worked, and played.

The Role of Men in Ancient Greece

Imagine having the most responsibility in your family. It was your job to take care of your family, provide for your family, make all the decisions for your household, and make sure your home was stable and under control at all times.

Ancient Greek men were the head of their households. Women and children needed to have permission from their husband or father if they wanted to leave the home. This might sound like a lot of extra work, but it was the role of men in ancient Greece.

Along with all the responsibilities, free men also enjoyed a lot of rights and recreational activities. Did you know the Olympics began in ancient Greece? The Olympic games were actually created for free ancient Greek men. Women were not able to participate, but they had a separate gaming event.

Men were also considered citizens, while women, children and slaves were not. Men were free to entertain and socialize outside of the home. They were also encouraged to venture out, engage in and host public events, and participate in political happenings. Some of their favorite outdoor activities were hunting and horse riding.

Education of Ancient Greek Males

What if you did not have to go to school? No homework, no tests, no projects! You might think that would be great, but the children of ancient Greece were happy to go to school! In fact, only boys and those who were not poor could attend school. Girls and families that were poor did not go to school, as they learned at home. So, in ancient Greece, it was a privilege to attend school!

In ancient Greek city-states, boys were taught at home until they were about seven years of age. Boys from middle class or wealthy families then entered school for a more formal education. Ancient Greek boys generally learned reading, writing, math, and music. Physical education was also an important subject. Around the age of eighteen, young men were required to join military school to receive training to learn to become warriors.

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