Copyright

Middle Ages Activities

Instructor: Dana Dance-Schissel

Dana teaches social sciences at the college level and English and psychology at the high school level. She has master's degrees in applied, clinical and community psychology.

The Middle Ages saw plagues, crusades and the fall of the Roman Empire. Teaching about the Middle Ages should be exciting and fun. These activities are designed to support this topic

Middle Ages Activities

The Middle Ages, which is also commonly referred to as the Medieval Period and sometimes as the Dark Ages, spanned from the late 5th century to the beginning of the 14th century. This time in history was largely governed by feudalism and the Catholic Church. These activities will help students connect with this fascinating time period.

Cathedrals of the Middle Ages Activity

The Middle Ages were heavily influenced by Catholicism. The construction of Gothic cathedrals became the order of the day, and this activity highlights them.

Materials

  • Internet access
  • Internet enabled devices
  • Slide presentation software
  • Projector

Instructions

  1. Divide the students into small groups of three to five students.
  2. Instruct the groups to use the Internet to research the most well-known cathedrals constructed during the Middle Ages.
  3. Ask each group to select five cathedrals to feature in a slide presentation. The presentation must include photographs and key facts about each cathedral. Students may choose to narrate their slide presentation or set it to music.
  4. Ask the students to take turns playing their slide presentations for the class.

Beans: The Source of Life in the Middle Ages Activity

Beans were successfully cultivated for the first time in Europe during the Middle Ages. This staple was relatively easy to grow and this activity gives students a chance to witness this.

Materials

  • Assorted dried beans
  • Potting soil
  • Paper cups
  • Water
  • Plastic wrap
  • Toothpicks

Instructions

  1. Explain to the class that beans were a main staple in the Medieval diet and that most people grew them themselves.
  2. Pass out the dried beans, one per student.
  3. Distribute the paper cups to the class now, one per student.
  4. Tell the class to write their names on their cups along with the date.
  5. Have each student add one scoop of potting soil to their paper cups.
  6. Now instruct the students to use their index fingers to create a divot in the soil.
  7. Ask the students drop their beans into the divot.
  8. Instruct the students to push the soil back over the bean and then water the soil until it is moist.
  9. Next, tell the students to cover their cups with plastic wrap and place them in a warm place.
  10. Have the students monitor their beans each day, noting any sprouts by writing the date the sprout emerges from the soil on the cup.
  • When students see sprouts, have them use the toothpicks to punch holes in the plastic wrap and continue watering the soil to keep it damp.
  • After two weeks, ask students to respond to the following questions in a group discussion:
    • How many of our beans sprouted?
    • How long might it take to grow beans for consumption?
    • How different would growing techniques have been in the Middle Ages?
    • What kinds of dishes could be made with beans?

The Bubonic Plague Activity

Nearly 30% of Europe's population was lost in the Middle Ages as a result of the Bubonic plague. This activity is designed to teach students about this deadly pandemic.

Materials

  • Internet access
  • Internet-enabled devices
  • Three pieces of poster board
  • Markers

To unlock this lesson you must be a Study.com Member.
Create your account

Register to view this lesson

Are you a student or a teacher?

Unlock Your Education

See for yourself why 30 million people use Study.com

Become a Study.com member and start learning now.
Become a Member  Back
What teachers are saying about Study.com
Try it risk-free for 30 days

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 200 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Create an account to start this course today
Try it risk-free for 30 days!
Create an account
Support