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Much Ado About Nothing Comprehension Questions

Instructor: Elisha Madison

Elisha is a writer, editor, and aspiring novelist. She has a Master's degree in Ancient Celtic History & Mythology and another Masters in Museum Studies.

Shakespeare's comedic play ''Much Ado About Nothing'' is about two couples that almost don't marry, and an evil villain that keeps trying to ruin everyone's lives. This lesson provides comprehension questions for students.

Much Ado About Nothing

The title of this Shakespeare play is not misleading; it's all about two couples and a bunch of drama that ensues over nothing. The first couple is Claudio and Hero. They fall in love at first sight, a classic Shakespeare trope. However, a villain, Don John, breaks them up because he tricks Claudio into thinking that Hero is sleeping with another man. Hijinks ensue, with Claudio leaving, then realizing he was wrong, and eventually marrying Hero.

Then there is the self-proclaimed bachelor and bachelorette of the play, Benedick and Beatrice. They never want to get married, but especially not to each other. They spend a good portion of the play mocking and taunting each other, which eventually leads to them getting married as well.

Comprehension Questions on Theme/Symbols/Writing Style

These questions follow the writing style of Shakespeare and how it is used throughout the play.

  • What symbolism is used throughout Much Ado About Nothing? Can you give some examples?
  • What is the meaning behind the name of the play?
  • What are the main themes of the play?
  • What elements of the play point towards comedy?
  • Shakespeare writes a lot about stubborn and sarcastic women; what other plays of his have these types of characters? Why do you think he writes women this way?
  • Does Shakespeare use any allusion in the play? If so, what are the some examples?
  • What is a soliloquy?
  • Where does Shakespeare use soliloquies in this play?

Comprehension Questions on Context

These questions involve the plot and characters of the play, to help students decipher between all of the subplots.

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