Music-Related Career Options

Instructor: John Hamilton

John has tutored algebra and SAT Prep and has a B.A. degree with a major in psychology and a minor in mathematics from Christopher Newport University.

In this lesson, we discuss potential music-related career options. We will also review how to promote music to help enrich students' lives, both for possible future employment and as a lifelong love and hobby.

Music Careers

Who does not love listening to music? There exist many different genres, and each style has its own unique appeal. Moreover, some people love music to such a degree that they decide to pursue a lifelong career in some form of musicology.

A musician can work as a composer and create works for contemporary, classical music, or opera, as well as develop music for jingles, video games, television commercials, or movies.

Who has not been mesmerized by a conductor and his fascinating hand movements and gyrations in front of a full orchestra? These are usually high-status jobs that are only earned after many years in the industry.

Cruise ship performers range from solo guitarists performing old favorites to actresses and actors in musicals.

A disc jockey can work at a local radio station. Many start out at their local college station.

A music critic, in a manner similar to a film critic, writes reviews for a band's new compact disc or single. The job also entails attending concerts and writing a synopsis of the evening. The critic may also conduct interviews with bands and pen a recap of the highlights.

A music teacher not only can work in the classroom environment, but also may utilize the internet to teach online.

A music therapist helps to possibly treat illnesses such as heart disease and depression. She can treat inmates in a prison to help them deal with anger or in a rehab center to help recovering addicts stay on course. The music therapist is also becoming a staple of the nursing home, as the Baby Boomer generation begins to age and Alzheimer's becomes an epidemic.

A sound engineer deals with the more technical side of the music industry. They ensure that amphitheaters are acoustically pleasing and may even design new musical equipment.

Have you ever heard of the famous studio musicians the Wrecking Crew from the 1960s? Studio musicians, or session musicians, are legendary for their ability to play at a high level for long hours, all while making few or even no mistakes. They often play on famous albums and can be hired for live sessions.

Do you remember the talent scout Simon Cowell from American Idol and other hit television shows? An A&R (artists and repertoire) scout, similar to a baseball scout, is responsible for finding and signing new talent for record companies. After signing the artist, the scout may be responsible for watching over the budding artists and monitoring their careers.

Students may develop a lifelong affinity for music.
practicing

Internet Music Careers

Of course, in this age of the internet, new music careers have come swiftly to the forefront. Blogging about music can be a rewarding and sometimes profitable career option. When the music blogger becomes established, he can then make money by the sale of advertising on the blog.

Computer engravers utilize a technique in which a musical score is eventually transferred onto a computer program.

Many music careers today involve the use of computers and other high-tech equipment.
equipment

A website copywriter is responsible for penning biographies about an artist, including career highlights and some personal information.

A website designer is charged with creating a website that is user friendly and will attract fans of the musician or band, and keeps them on the site as long as possible.

Promoting Music in Students' Lives

How can educators promote music to students and make it an integral part of their lives? After all, for some students music will become a career, but for almost all students music will become a lifelong hobby.

Some teachers, when allowed by their administrators, will actually play music in the classroom. Most of us remember singing nursery rhymes and songs at the elementary school level but for whatever reason, the practice disappears at the middle school and high school levels.

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