Organizational Citizenship Behavior in the Workplace: Definition and Examples

Organizational Citizenship Behavior in the Workplace: Definition and Examples
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  • 0:07 Defining…
  • 0:49 Examples of…
  • 2:13 Do Companies Need This?
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Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Rob Wengrzyn
Organizational citizenship is a concept that all companies wish to have but very few can actually achieve. It is rooted in individual employees' view of the company and how they associate themselves with it.

Defining Organizational Citizenship

We can look at a company like a little city. It has a mayor (typically the owner or the person highest in charge) as well as different departments (heck, we can even have the cleaning crew as the sanitation department). So if we can look at a company like a little city, we can begin to look at the employees as citizens of that city. With that perspective in mind, we can see how citizens of our little city want it to be the best city it can be. They have a stake in wanting the city to be clean, prosperous and friendly.

What we are talking about when we look at a business from a perspective of a company being a city and wanting employees to feel closely associated with the city is organizational citizenship, or a perspective that employees have whereby they extend their behaviors beyond the normal duties of their position.

Examples of Organizational Citizenship

The sheer scope of organizational citizenship is far-reaching, and in a very good way. The employee who believes in (or we say 'practices') good organizational citizenship is one who has an eye out for the company's best interest at all times. That can take many different forms, such as:

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