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Peer Reviewed Scholarly Journal: Definition & Examples

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Instructor: Mary Firestone
Find out what peer-reviewed scholarly journals are and how to find them. Learn what qualities to look for in peer-reviewed journals and see some examples. Read the lesson, then take a quiz to test your knowledge.

Peer-Reviewed Scholarly Journals

When you receive an essay assignment, your instructor might ask you to use articles from peer-reviewed scholarly journals to support your ideas. A peer-reviewed scholarly journal is one written by experts in a particular discipline. After the author's peers, who are other experts in the field, have reviewed the article and given it a stamp of approval, the article is published in a journal. This approval by other experts adds a lot of credibility to the claims in the article.

Examples of Peer-Reviewed Journals

Here are a few examples of peer-reviewed journals:

  • The Journal of American Medicine (JAMA)
  • The Journal of Reviews on Global Economics
  • The Journal of Sports Science and Medicine

Finding Peer-Reviewed Journals

You can find peer-reviewed journal articles by entering the name of the journal in your search engine. Hard copies are also available in some libraries. However, the best place to begin your search is at your college or local library, which has access to large databases, such as ProQuest and EBSCO, which give you access to thousands of peer-reviewed journal articles.

After you log in to one of the databases, enter your topic in the search box. Before you click 'search,' click on the 'peer-reviewed' option to be sure you get the right results. Most of the articles are available as PDFs, so you can download or print your own copy.

Characteristics of Peer-Reviewed Journals

Regardless of where you search, the Web or a library database, check for the following to ensure that your article is a scholarly, peer-reviewed source:

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