Copyright

Peer Reviewing an Essay: Reviewing an Essay for Grammar

An error occurred trying to load this video.

Try refreshing the page, or contact customer support.

Coming up next: Peer Reviewing an Essay: Copyediting a Peer's Work

You're on a roll. Keep up the good work!

Watch Next Lesson
 Replay
Your next lesson will play in 10 seconds
  • 0:00 What Is Peer Editing?
  • 1:22 Sample Essay
  • 2:04 Answer Key
  • 4:29 Lesson Summary
Add to Add to Add to

Want to watch this again later?

Log in or sign up to add this lesson to a Custom Course.

Log in or Sign up

Timeline
Autoplay
Autoplay
Speed
Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Kerry Gray

Kerry has been a teacher and an administrator for more than twenty years. She has a Master of Education degree.

In this lesson, we will learn how to peer review an essay for grammar. Further, we will examine an unedited essay and provide an example describing effective feedback.

What Is Peer Editing?

What is peer editing? Peer editing is when students read one another's writing and provide feedback. The writer benefits by becoming more comfortable with sharing his work, while the editor gains exposure to the writing of an author with comparable skill. Both writer and editor become more adept at looking for important details that will improve their own writing. Peer-editing may include grammar, content, or both. In this lesson, we will focus specifically on editing for grammar. Grammar focuses on the way sentences are put together. It includes sentence structure, capitalization/punctuation, and spelling.

When you edit another person's work for grammar, you will look for:

  • Punctuation: Did the author place periods, question marks, exclamation points, commas, and quotation marks in the correct places?
  • Capitalization: Did the author use capital letters at the beginning of each sentence and with all proper nouns and and titles?
  • Sentence Structure: Did the author use complete sentences, rather than fragments or run-ons? Did the author use correct subject/verb agreement? Did the author use consistent verb tense?
  • Spelling: Are all words spelled correctly based on context?

Now let's take a look at an excerpt from an essay with some grammatical errors. See if you can identify the errors using the checklist above.

Sample Essay

When Martin Luther King, jr. was a child. he was aware of injustices against black Americans, but believed in developing peacful solutions. Even when the school bully attacked him, Martin did not fight back. He does not even respond when a white woman slapped him and called him a name.

Despite his decision to hold his tongue, King felt some resentment towards white people after completeing hi school two years early, he began college with a chip on his shoulder. However, his experience with the intercollegiate Council provided him with opportunities to get to know white students, which changed his perspective. Dr King began to see himself as a problem-solver, which eventually led to his role as a civil rites activist.

Answer Key

Let's break this down one sentence at a time to see if you caught them all.

  • When Martin Luther King, jr. was a child. he was aware of injustices against black Americans but believed in developing peacful solutions.

This is a sentence fragment that needs to be combined into one sentence. Also, 'Jr.' is part of King's title and should be capitalized. Further, 'peaceful' is misspelled. Let's rewrite the sentence correctly:

  • When Martin Luther King, Jr. was a child, he was aware of injustices against black Americans but believed in developing peaceful solutions.

The next sentence was written correctly:

  • Even when the school bully attacked him, Martin did not fight back.

In the next sentence, the author slips from past tense into present tense without reason.

  • He does not even respond when a white woman slapped him and called him a name.

This should be written:

  • He did not even respond when a white woman slapped him and called him a name.

The next sentence is a run-on sentence.

To unlock this lesson you must be a Study.com Member.
Create your account

Register to view this lesson

Are you a student or a teacher?

Unlock Your Education

See for yourself why 30 million people use Study.com

Become a Study.com member and start learning now.
Become a Member  Back
What teachers are saying about Study.com
Try it risk-free for 30 days

Earning College Credit

Did you know… We have over 160 college courses that prepare you to earn credit by exam that is accepted by over 1,500 colleges and universities. You can test out of the first two years of college and save thousands off your degree. Anyone can earn credit-by-exam regardless of age or education level.

To learn more, visit our Earning Credit Page

Transferring credit to the school of your choice

Not sure what college you want to attend yet? Study.com has thousands of articles about every imaginable degree, area of study and career path that can help you find the school that's right for you.

Create an account to start this course today
Try it risk-free for 30 days!
Create An Account
Support