Persuasive Essay Rubric Examples

Instructor: Clio Stearns

Clio has taught education courses at the college level and has a Ph.D. in curriculum and instruction.

If your students are writing persuasive essays, it can be helpful to work with clear assessment criteria. This lesson offers you some examples of how to make a rubric to evaluate your students' work.

Why Persuasive Essay Rubrics?

Are your students learning how to write persuasive essays? If so, you might be looking for a way to assess their work that is clear and fair. After all, persuasive essays are not easy. They have to adequately convey an argument while still maintaining stylistic coherence and organization. One great way to assess your students' writing is by using a rubric. Rubrics allow you to think about exactly which categories of a student's writing are most important to you as a teacher. Then, you establish clear criteria for how they can succeed in each of these categories. Of course, categories will look different for each teacher, and you will need to think about what you most want to emphasize as important to your students. Students usually appreciate rubrics for the clarity they offer and also because they show that every student is being held to the same standards. When you use a rubric, you will probably find grading easier because you will know exactly what you are looking for! The rubric examples in this lesson will help you grade your students' persuasive essays; however, you can modify them to make them your own.

Process-Oriented Rubric

This rubric will be helpful if the most important thing for you is your students' use of the writing process.

Brainstorming

  • 4- The student thought about many different possible arguments and did a strong job narrowing his/her choice down prior to beginning the work.
  • 3- The student thought about at least two different possible arguments and did a strong job narrowing his/her choice down prior to beginning the work.
  • 2- The student spent time brainstorming but really only thought about one major idea for the argument.
  • 1- The student neglected the brainstorming portion of the writing process.

Organization

  • 4- The student planned out the essay carefully using an outline, and the organization of the writing contributes to the overall soundness of the argument.
  • 3- The student planned out the essay using an outline, and the organization of the writing contributes somewhat to the argument.
  • 2- The student planned out the essay using an outline, but the essay remains poorly organized.
  • 1- The student did not do any advance organization or planning.

Revision

  • 4- The student made substantial revisions between drafts of the essay, and the revisions contribute to a more persuasive and readable piece of work.
  • 3- The student made some revisions between drafts of the essay, and the revisions contribute to a more persuasive and readable piece of work.
  • 2- The student made few revisions between drafts of the essay, but the revisions do not contribute to a more persuasive and readable piece of work.
  • 1- The student made no revisions between drafts of the essay.

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