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Phoneme Blending & Segmentation Lesson Plan

Instructor: Sharon Linde

Sharon has a Masters of Science in Mathematics

Help your students practice blending and segmenting phonemes with this lesson plan. A variety of games and activities are outlined for use in your classroom using materials you have handy and applicable to students in differing levels.

Learning Objectives

After this lesson, students will be able to:

  • blend and segment phonemes

Length

30 minutes each

Materials

  • Image of a cute cat, copied onto paper and divided into three sections (with a simple vertical line)
  • Paper mice, about one by one inch
  • Picture cards
  • Goldfish or oyster crackers
  • Paper bags
  • Small race cars
  • Index cards with simple three letter words written on them
  • Soft ball

Key Vocabulary

  • Phoneme
  • Blend
  • Segment

Curriculum Standards

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.1.2

Demonstrate understanding of spoken words, syllables, and sounds (phonemes).

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.1.2.b

Orally produce single-syllable words by blending sounds (phonemes), including consonant blends.

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.1.2.c

Isolate and pronounce initial, medial vowel, and final sounds (phonemes) in spoken single-syllable words.

  • CCSS.ELA-Literacy.RF.1.2.d

Segment spoken single-syllable words into their complete sequence of individual sounds (phonemes).

Activities

Cat and Mouse Phoneme Isolation

  • Give each student the copies of your cute cat page and have them color and decorate.
  • Now give them a little mouse to color as well.
  • When ready, tell students you're going to play 'Cat and Mouse' together. You'll say a simple word, such as 'hot,' then say one of the three sounds, or phonemes, such as /h/.
  • Students should lay the mouse on the first, second or third section of their cat to show where the individual phoneme you said comes in the word. In this case, the /h/ is first, so the mouse would go in the first section.

Munch and Blend

  • Play this game first as a whole group, modeling the process, before sending students to play in small groups or with a partner.
  • Give each student a handful of crackers.
  • Show a picture card, such as the image of a fish.
  • Demonstrate how to slide one cracker for each phoneme in the word. For example, the word 'fish' has three phonemes, /f/, /i/, and /sh/.
  • Exaggerate the sounds as you blend and slide the fish across the desk, then ask:
    • How many phonemes does the word 'fish' have?
  • Allow students to eat their goldfish, then repeat with another word until students seem to be able to play independently.
  • Give each group a set of images and allow them to play as you walk around to scaffold and support. Pull students who need additional assistance for more guided work.

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