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Positive Peer Pressure: Definition, Facts & Examples

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  • 0:04 Positive Peer Pressure
  • 1:56 Does Positive Peer…
  • 2:49 How Positive Peer…
  • 3:48 Lesson Summary
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Lesson Transcript
Instructor: Gaines Arnold
This lesson looks at how individuals can be positively influenced by peers. Positive peer pressure is defined as it relates to different outcomes, facts regarding how well positive peer pressure works are discussed, and several examples are detailed.

Positive Peer Pressure

When David entered the seventh grade, he moved to a new school district and was suddenly without friends. A redistricting meant that he was alone because he lived on one side of the street and all his friends lived on the other. David had always been shy, but he quickly found a group of students who accepted him into their group. At first, they were cool, but it didn't take long before he was involved in some risky behavior. He smoked for the first time and helped egg a house on Halloween. David might have continued to follow the first group he met if he hadn't found other friends. Through a class project, David met three other people who were interested in the same things he was. He was encouraged to stop following the poor decision makers and eventually changed the group he was hanging out with completely. Through positive peer pressure, David had been given a chance to make better choices.

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