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Practical Application: Crafting Strong & Coherent Paragraphs in Business Communication

Instructor: Angela Janovsky

Angela has taught middle and high school English, Business English and Speech for nine years. She has a bachelor's degree in psychology and has earned her teaching license.

Communication in business is a cornerstone of success. Here you will have an opportunity to practice writing a strong paragraph as a part of a business communication.

Business Communication

Think about your workplace. How do you communicate with your fellow employees? How does your boss communicate with you? How does the company communicate with clients? Other businesses?

We often take for granted the many modes of communication now available to us. However, business communications are extremely important in our modern world. Your skill as a writer will be judged by your bosses, clients, colleagues and more. How will you ever be successful professionally if your writing skills are a hindrance to your communications?

The lesson Crafting Strong and Coherent Paragraphs in Business Communication outlines the basics of a cohesive paragraph, including:

  • Topic sentence - reflects the main idea near the beginning of the letter
  • Supporting sentences - used to offer more detail to develop the topic sentence
  • Transitions - words or phrases that help tie the whole body together and add flow

Now let's put those concepts into practice. We will begin with a fictional scenario requiring a business communication. You will then be responsible for writing that text. Here is the outline of that scenario.

Scenario

Mick Strovinski owns his own business pouring concrete. For many years he has specialized in smaller jobs like personal driveways, patios, and other jobs in residential areas. However, he has grown his business of late and wants to branch out into jobs for the city or local government.

A job pouring the parking lot, driveways, and foundation of a brand new City Hall for the city of Eastlake has opened up for bids. Mick desperately wants it, but he must email his bid and an outline of the job to Mayor Johnson in order to compete for it. Here is the information he must convey in his email:

  • The total price is $86,000, including all materials and labor.
  • The job will take 3-4 weeks to complete.
  • The job includes pouring two driveways: one onto Center Road and one onto Smith Avenue.
  • The job includes pouring the foundation for the building, including basement offices.
  • The job includes pouring the parking lot, which is 100 ft. x 200 ft.
  • The job does not include curbs, parking barriers, or walkways around the building.
  • The job will require six people working each day.

Analysis Questions

Your next task is to write this email, but first look at the following questions. These will help you organize the communication before you begin to write.

  • What is the main purpose of the email?
  • In what order should the information be given within the email?
  • What sort of transitions can you use to connect all of the information?
  • How will you close the email?

Once you have brainstormed your responses to these questions, write the email as if you are Mick.

Sample Email

Now that you have written your own version of Mick's email, here is an example for comparison:

Subject Line: Bid for Eastlake City Hall

Dear Mayor Johnson,

I am writing to outline my bid for the job of pouring the concrete for the new Eastlake City Hall building, including the parking lot, foundation, and driveways.

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